satwcomic:

Nordic Halloween
America is dressed as the Marvel god/superhero Thor, while the rest are dressed as the version of the gods from the comic “Valhalla”. Sweden is dressed as Odin.One superhero that for sure will never be taken seriously in Scandinavia is Thor. Ever. XD"Valhalla" is a re-interpretation of the old myths. For example, even though he’s a jackass, Loki doesn’t turn more and more evil. It’s just the other gods who trust him less and less because he keep causing trouble, and in the end they start blaming him for things he didn’t do.

satwcomic:

Nordic Halloween



America is dressed as the Marvel god/superhero Thor, while the rest are dressed as the version of the gods from the comic “Valhalla”. Sweden is dressed as Odin.

One superhero that for sure will never be taken seriously in Scandinavia is Thor. Ever. XD

"Valhalla" is a re-interpretation of the old myths. For example, even though he’s a jackass, Loki doesn’t turn more and more evil. It’s just the other gods who trust him less and less because he keep causing trouble, and in the end they start blaming him for things he didn’t do.

Secession petitioners vs. Deportation petitioners

shortformblog:

115k signatories petitioned the White House to ask that Texas be allowed to secede from the United States 

24k signatories petitioned the White House to demand deportation for Americans who sign secession petitions

(Source: forbes.com)

spytap:

I hope that in the near future, when we look back at September 11th, 2001, we will remember not only the tragedy and courage of the day itself, but also our response to the events.

To me, that’s what I remember most about September 11th, 2001: that in grief, we were united - in the best sense of the word - despite its roots in sadness. We had watched 2977 innocent people murdered live on national television, replayed over and over again until it made us sick, and yet in our confusion we defaulted to comforting and protecting each other. We were all Americans, all attacked, all dealing with the tragedy together.

But days later, our national demeanor changed, along with our national discourse. As a nation we became fearful, and full of anger. We began to lash out externally and internally, choosing to respond to hatred with more hatred. We set upon our own with an appetite for xenophobia that bordered on ravenous. In doing so, we lost much.

We are a country born of immigrants, but immigrants became the enemy. We are a country whose culture is formed and shaped in a melting pot, but we gazed upon certain members of our own with explicit suspicion. We are a country whose core values are of religious freedom - values so important that they were writ at the cost of blood - and yet we cast them aside without hesitation to scorn, threaten, and even assault those who “dared” to believe differently.

What happened 11 years ago was a tragedy in the truest sense of the word, but we only compounded the tragedy with our response. In the days after September 11th, 2001, we showed the best of ourselves as a nation, but followed it with the worst. A decade later, we’re still dealing with the effects. Children barely young enough to remember the event itself are now old enough to discriminate because of it. They’ve been taught by eleven years’ worth of base emotion to fear and hate their fellow citizens, and what they’ve witnessed during their formative years will create a lifetime’s worth of internal and external conflict. We’re only now beginning to repair the damage but it may take an entire generation to get us back on track.

We can be better - not just in the sense of wounds healing, but in all aspects of the word. We can learn all the lessons there are to learn from a tragedy and from our response. We can heal and make ourselves stronger at the break. We can remember that when we chose to make our hearts so vulnerable in the first place, it was because the alternative wasn’t who we wanted to be as a people. And one day I hope that when we look back on this event in years to come, we’ll be able to say that our insanity was temporary, and that we’re better now. Because we can be; we can be so much better.

I’ve seen it in us.

(via maxistentialist)

futurejournalismproject:

(In)tolerance
A poll released today by the Arab American Institute explores attitudes Americans have toward Arabs and Muslims. 
“The data extracted,” the Institute writes, ”indicates that anti-Arab and anti-Muslim political rhetoric has taken a toll on American public opinion, especially along age and party lines.”
Takeaways from the report:

1. Arabs, Muslims, Arab Americans, and American Muslims have the lowest favorable/highest unfavorable ratings among the groups covered.
2. Muslims were the only group with a net unfavorable rating.
3. Note that one in five Americans were either unfamiliar with or not sure of their attitudes toward these communities.
4. Sikhs and Mormons also fare poorly, but in the case of Sikhs, one in four Americans are “unfamiliar” or “not sure”.
5. There is a deep generational divide, which is reflected in a partisan divide.
6. Younger Americans (18-25) rate Arabs and Muslims up to 17 points higher than the older generation. They also rate Arab Americans and American Muslims higher as well.
7. Younger Americans rate Catholics and the various Protestant denominations covered in the survey almost 20 points lower than do older Americans (65+). The younger group also rates Mormons 15 points lower.
8. This is reflected in a deep partisan divide and even more so in a division between those who describe themselves as Obama or Romney voters. For example, note how the ratings given to Arabs and Muslims by Obama and Romney voters are mirror reflections of each other. While Obama voters give Arabs a net 51%/29% favorable rating and Muslims a net 53%/29% rating; Romney voters give Arabs a 30%/50% net unfavorable rating and Muslims a 25%/57% unfavorable rating.
9. Democrats and Obama voters give no group a net negative rating. Republicans and Romney voters only give strong negative ratings to Arabs, Muslims, Arab Americans, and American Muslims.

Image: Detail from The American Divide: How We View Arabs and Muslims.

futurejournalismproject:

(In)tolerance

poll released today by the Arab American Institute explores attitudes Americans have toward Arabs and Muslims. 

“The data extracted,” the Institute writes, ”indicates that anti-Arab and anti-Muslim political rhetoric has taken a toll on American public opinion, especially along age and party lines.”

Takeaways from the report:

1. Arabs, Muslims, Arab Americans, and American Muslims have the lowest favorable/highest unfavorable ratings among the groups covered.

2. Muslims were the only group with a net unfavorable rating.

3. Note that one in five Americans were either unfamiliar with or not sure of their attitudes toward these communities.

4. Sikhs and Mormons also fare poorly, but in the case of Sikhs, one in four Americans are “unfamiliar” or “not sure”.

5. There is a deep generational divide, which is reflected in a partisan divide.

6. Younger Americans (18-25) rate Arabs and Muslims up to 17 points higher than the older generation. They also rate Arab Americans and American Muslims higher as well.

7. Younger Americans rate Catholics and the various Protestant denominations covered in the survey almost 20 points lower than do older Americans (65+). The younger group also rates Mormons 15 points lower.

8. This is reflected in a deep partisan divide and even more so in a division between those who describe themselves as Obama or Romney voters. For example, note how the ratings given to Arabs and Muslims by Obama and Romney voters are mirror reflections of each other. While Obama voters give Arabs a net 51%/29% favorable rating and Muslims a net 53%/29% rating; Romney voters give Arabs a 30%/50% net unfavorable rating and Muslims a 25%/57% unfavorable rating.

9. Democrats and Obama voters give no group a net negative rating. Republicans and Romney voters only give strong negative ratings to Arabs, Muslims, Arab Americans, and American Muslims.

Image: Detail from The American Divide: How We View Arabs and Muslims.

(via npr)

artofthewire:

Happy Independence Day!

artofthewire:

Happy Independence Day!

chicagohistorymuseum:

Portrait of Miss Miriam Mooney, a singer from Tennessee, wrapped in an American flag, standing near a low chain barricade at Grant Park in the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois, c. 1917. Photograph from the Chicago Daily News. 
Want a copy of this photo? > Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: DN-0068632

chicagohistorymuseum:

Portrait of Miss Miriam Mooney, a singer from Tennessee, wrapped in an American flag, standing near a low chain barricade at Grant Park in the Loop community area of Chicago, Illinois, c. 1917. Photograph from the Chicago Daily News. 

Want a copy of this photo? > Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: DN-0068632

motherjones:

Hey, it’s July 4th! Happy Independence Day if you’re here in the US! (Happy Wednesday, Canada!) Big ups to everyone working, in some way or another, to make this a safer, cleaner, more equal country for everyone.

Also, especially if you live on our block: For the love of God please point your fireworks away from people’s faces this year. Seriously. Y’all terrify us sometimes.

Today, we celebrate our Independence Day.

(Source: youtube.com)

"Kids play T-ball, then baseball; they play games and have practice every week and, if they’re serious about it, pre-season and post-season too. We never think, “Let’s have kids play baseball for eight weeks in seventh grade,” and then expect that in five years they can join the majors or even be on a college team. But for some reason we do this with civics. We say, “We’re going to have you do a penny harvest in fifth grade and a service learning project in tenth grade, and then we’ll teach you abstractly about government for a semester in twelfth grade.” Then our students enter the major leagues of citizenship, and we give them the vote and expect them to keep our country going. And that’s just crazy!"

Meira Levinson talking about her new book No Citizen Left Behind. (via bostonreview)

Wow. Just, wow. Quote of the week.

(via motherjones)

(via motherjones)

radmax:

apio:

What began as a joke on fb with April turned into me making some For Your Consideration posters. Because Oscar season is nigh and I think it’s time Channing Tatum gets the recognition he deserves.

I wish I could rearrange this photoset so that Rihanna’s is the most prominent because I actually “LOL’ed” when I saw it.

I didn’t realize she was acting now.

Also, from the other Battleship poster, “I got a boner for America.”

(via unlawfulgatherer)

A live-action recreation of For Lack of a Better Comic:

The Atlantic:

What America Looks Like: Aboard A Coast Guard Cutter

"Ryan Hoyt works on the rig of the Coast Guard Cutter Barque Eagle, which was originally operated by Nazi Germany to train cadets for the German Navy. The ship was taken by the U.S. as a war prize after World War II."


I love this series.

The Atlantic:

What America Looks Like: Aboard A Coast Guard Cutter

"Ryan Hoyt works on the rig of the Coast Guard Cutter Barque Eagle, which was originally operated by Nazi Germany to train cadets for the German Navy. The ship was taken by the U.S. as a war prize after World War II."

I love this series.

1932: America looks at neighbors.

1932: America looks at neighbors.

(Source: reddit.com)

motherjones:

Hello again, Tumblr!
My, how we missed you, what with all the drinking and the tossing of personal incendiary devices and the America America AMERICA YOU BETCHA, YOU PINKO BASTARDness of July 4 at our mom’s house.
Let’s never be apart again.
(Photo via)

motherjones:

Hello again, Tumblr!

My, how we missed you, what with all the drinking and the tossing of personal incendiary devices and the America America AMERICA YOU BETCHA, YOU PINKO BASTARDness of July 4 at our mom’s house.

Let’s never be apart again.

(Photo via)

"If I stood up here and said we should bomb every church in America, it would be blasted all over the world, but when I sit here and talk about moderation, it will not make it into the media."

— Feisal Abdul Rauf (via aifestival)