fastcodesign:

Star Wars Imperial Forces Invade Thomas Kinkade’s Precious Paintings
Some genius named Jeff Bennett has unleashed the full force of the Dark Side on the Painter of Light’s treacly, bucolic world in a new series called “Wars on Kinkade.”
At the time of his death in 2012, Thomas Kinkade was the most collected living artist in America, with an estimated one in 20 homes owning one of his original paintings. Apparently this made Darth Vader very jealous and angry, so he sicked his automaton army on Kinkade’s cutesy compositions.
More> Co.Design

I need these for my apartment walls.

fastcodesign:

Star Wars Imperial Forces Invade Thomas Kinkade’s Precious Paintings

Some genius named Jeff Bennett has unleashed the full force of the Dark Side on the Painter of Light’s treacly, bucolic world in a new series called “Wars on Kinkade.”

At the time of his death in 2012, Thomas Kinkade was the most collected living artist in America, with an estimated one in 20 homes owning one of his original paintings. Apparently this made Darth Vader very jealous and angry, so he sicked his automaton army on Kinkade’s cutesy compositions.

More> Co.Design

I need these for my apartment walls.

(via latimes)

cavetocanvas:

arthistorygifs:

The Temptation of St Anthony - Salvador Dalí

This tumblr turns famous artworks into gifs to explain/provide meaning into the painting. Not too many up yet, but the concept is awesome.

cavetocanvas:

arthistorygifs:

The Temptation of St Anthony - Salvador Dalí

This tumblr turns famous artworks into gifs to explain/provide meaning into the painting. Not too many up yet, but the concept is awesome.

(via mchughla)

Starry Night Over the Rhone - Vincent van Gogh

Starry Night Over the Rhone - Vincent van Gogh

nprfreshair:

Good morning! Here is Willie as Vincent and Marge as the Girl with the Pearl Earring.

insolacion:

David Barton

Vincent looks more like Groundskeeper Willie.

nationalpost:

9/11 Truther vandalizes Statue of Liberty-inspiring Delacroix painting at the LouvreA visitor to the Louvre’s newest extension, in northern France, has been detained after scrawling an inscription in marker on the famed canvas of Eugene Delacroix Liberty Leading the People.According to Le Figaro newspaper, the woman wrote “AE911″ near the bottom of the canvas. The inscription stands for “Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth,” a group of individuals who believe George W. Bush is responsible for the collapse of the Twin Towers in New York City on Sept. 11, 2001. The group comprises architects, engineers and demolition experts who believe there is empirical evidence to suggest 9/11 was an inside job.The 28-year-old woman was immediately seized by a guard and another visitor, then handed over to police, according to a statement from the Louvre-Lens on Friday. It said the painting should be easily cleaned.

nationalpost:

9/11 Truther vandalizes Statue of Liberty-inspiring Delacroix painting at the Louvre
A visitor to the Louvre’s newest extension, in northern France, has been detained after scrawling an inscription in marker on the famed canvas of Eugene Delacroix Liberty Leading the People.

According to Le Figaro newspaper, the woman wrote “AE911″ near the bottom of the canvas. The inscription stands for “Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth,” a group of individuals who believe George W. Bush is responsible for the collapse of the Twin Towers in New York City on Sept. 11, 2001. The group comprises architects, engineers and demolition experts who believe there is empirical evidence to suggest 9/11 was an inside job.

The 28-year-old woman was immediately seized by a guard and another visitor, then handed over to police, according to a statement from the Louvre-Lens on Friday. It said the painting should be easily cleaned.

fuckyeahbookarts:

The Lost Sketchbook of Guillermo del Toro:

Filmmaker Guillermo del Toro put all his ideas for `Pan’s Labyrinth’ in a notebook — then lost it.

The heavyset man ran down the London street, panting, chasing the taxi. When it didn’t stop, he hopped into another cab. “Follow that cab!” he yelled. Guillermo del Toro wasn’t directing this movie. He was living it. And it was turning into a horror tale.

The Mexican filmmaker keeps all of his ideas in leather notebooks. And Del Toro had just left four years of work in the back seat of a British cab. Unlike in the movies, though, Del Toro couldn’t catch the taxi. Visits to the police and the taxi company proved equally fruitless.

Del Toro’s films — “Chronos,” “The Devil’s Backbone,” “Blade II,” “Hellboy” — typically feature magical realism. Fate was about to return the storytelling favor.

The cabbie spotted the misplaced journal. Working from a scrap of stationery that didn’t even have the name of Del Toro’s hotel (just its logo), the driver returned the book two days later. An overwhelmed Del Toro promptly gave him an approximately $900 tip.

The sketches and the ideas in that misplaced journal — four years of notes on character design, ruminations about plot — were the foundation of “Pan’s Labyrinth,” a child’s fantasy set in the wake of the Spanish Civil War.

The director, who at the time wasn’t even sure he’d actually make “Pan’s Labyrinth,” took the cabbie’s act as a sign, and plunged himself into the movie.

motherjones:

Gay Marriage Seed Art at the Minnesota State Fair
theatlantic:

Everything We Thought We Knew About the Swedish Chef Is Wrong

Boorishly, we just lump everyone into the same “Scandinavian” group, calling him Swedish because, well, that’s his name. Who knew the Swedish Chef would be at the source of so much cultural misunderstanding? But it seems clear from this piece that America needs to try harder. Sweden is not just Ikea, ABBA, Dragon Tattoo books, and meatballs. Sweden is most definitely not a Muppet, even if this particular Muppet has become a thorn in Sweden’s side. Though some say there’s a definite Julia Child quality to the chef, and an actualSwedish chef claims he was the inspiration for the character, it turns out Henson’s inspiration for his chef may have simply been some Berlitz tapes.

Read more. [Image: Flickr/Harsh/Light]

I love this part:

[Swedes] don’t think he’s funny, partly because the nonsense he speaks is interpreted as Swedish, or Swedish-sounding, a fact “bewildering and annoying to Swedes,” writes Stahl … To Swedes, the chef sounds Norwegian.

theatlantic:

Everything We Thought We Knew About the Swedish Chef Is Wrong

Boorishly, we just lump everyone into the same “Scandinavian” group, calling him Swedish because, well, that’s his name. Who knew the Swedish Chef would be at the source of so much cultural misunderstanding? But it seems clear from this piece that America needs to try harder. Sweden is not just Ikea, ABBA, Dragon Tattoo books, and meatballs. Sweden is most definitely not a Muppet, even if this particular Muppet has become a thorn in Sweden’s side. Though some say there’s a definite Julia Child quality to the chef, and an actualSwedish chef claims he was the inspiration for the character, it turns out Henson’s inspiration for his chef may have simply been some Berlitz tapes.

Read more. [Image: Flickr/Harsh/Light]

I love this part:

[Swedes] don’t think he’s funny, partly because the nonsense he speaks is interpreted as Swedish, or Swedish-sounding, a fact “bewildering and annoying to Swedes,” writes Stahl … To Swedes, the chef sounds Norwegian.

theatlantic:

David Rakoff, Essayist and ‘This American Life’ Contributor Has Died at Age 47

Before devoting himself to writing fulltime, Rakoff worked in publishing. At this time, he befriended Ira Glass, then a producer at NPR’s Morning Edition. When Glass went on to create This American Life, he invited Rakoff to read his deadpan essays on the show. Along with David Sedaris, Rakoff would help establish the show’s distinctive voice. Rakoff also began pursuing a career as a prolific freelance journalist for the publications like New York,The New York Times, and Salon. He wrote three books of essays, Fraud, Don’t Get Too Comfortable, and Half Empty, and last year, he was awarded the Thurber Prize for Humor. 

Read more. [Image: Pop!Tech via Flickr]

theatlantic:

David Rakoff, Essayist and ‘This American Life’ Contributor Has Died at Age 47

Before devoting himself to writing fulltime, Rakoff worked in publishing. At this time, he befriended Ira Glass, then a producer at NPR’s Morning Edition. When Glass went on to create This American Life, he invited Rakoff to read his deadpan essays on the show. Along with David Sedaris, Rakoff would help establish the show’s distinctive voice. Rakoff also began pursuing a career as a prolific freelance journalist for the publications like New York,The New York Timesand Salon. He wrote three books of essays, FraudDon’t Get Too Comfortable, and Half Empty, and last year, he was awarded the Thurber Prize for Humor. 

Read more. [Image: Pop!Tech via Flickr]

theatlantic:

“This is how Maurice Sendak sometimes sent his letters. Just imagine getting one.” (via Letters Of Note)

theatlantic:

“This is how Maurice Sendak sometimes sent his letters. Just imagine getting one.” (via Letters Of Note)

theatlantic:

The Cabin in the Woods Disembowels the Slasher Film

Stop me if you’ve seen this one: A handful of attractive young folks representing immediately recognizable types—the good girl, the sexy girl, the jock, the decent guy, the stoner—plan a weekend of partying at a remote cabin in the woods. When they arrive, though, something timeless and implacable begins stalking and brutally slaughtering them one by one. Liquor-fueled rounds of “truth or dare” and displays of nubile flesh give way to screaming and running and bleeding and dying.
On second thought, don’t stop me. Even if you’ve seen this one—even if you’ve seen it over and over again—you haven’t seen this one, this The Cabin in the Woods. Produced by Joss Whedon, who also co-wrote with director (and longtime Whedonite) Drew Goddard, the movie is a delightful demolition of the horror genre, a tale that subverts not only its own terrors, but those of pretty much every scary movie you’ve ever seen. Why do the protagonists of these films always choose the worst moment and locale to have sex? Why do they split up when it’s evident they should stick together? The Cabin in the Woods at last offers answers.
This is a movie best seen with a minimum of foreknowledge, so I’ll spoil as little as possible. (I’d strongly recommend avoiding the trailer, which reveals a good deal more than I will.) Suffice to say that there are two interwoven narratives taking place at once: the one in the woods with the kids (among them Kristen Connolly and Thor’s Chris Hemsworth); and another, at a secret bunker of the military-industrial complex, where two beleaguered company men (Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford), along with a large cadre of technicians, accountants, interns, and various other drones, are hard at work, doing—well, if I told you what they were doing, someone (not me) would presumably have to kill you.
Read more. [Image: Lionsgate]

A message from this Joss Whedon fanboy to Tumblr: The Cabin in the Woods is excellent.

theatlantic:

The Cabin in the Woods Disembowels the Slasher Film

Stop me if you’ve seen this one: A handful of attractive young folks representing immediately recognizable types—the good girl, the sexy girl, the jock, the decent guy, the stoner—plan a weekend of partying at a remote cabin in the woods. When they arrive, though, something timeless and implacable begins stalking and brutally slaughtering them one by one. Liquor-fueled rounds of “truth or dare” and displays of nubile flesh give way to screaming and running and bleeding and dying.

On second thought, don’t stop me. Even if you’ve seen this one—even if you’ve seen it over and over again—you haven’t seen this one, this The Cabin in the Woods. Produced by Joss Whedon, who also co-wrote with director (and longtime Whedonite) Drew Goddard, the movie is a delightful demolition of the horror genre, a tale that subverts not only its own terrors, but those of pretty much every scary movie you’ve ever seen. Why do the protagonists of these films always choose the worst moment and locale to have sex? Why do they split up when it’s evident they should stick together? The Cabin in the Woods at last offers answers.

This is a movie best seen with a minimum of foreknowledge, so I’ll spoil as little as possible. (I’d strongly recommend avoiding the trailer, which reveals a good deal more than I will.) Suffice to say that there are two interwoven narratives taking place at once: the one in the woods with the kids (among them Kristen Connolly and Thor’s Chris Hemsworth); and another, at a secret bunker of the military-industrial complex, where two beleaguered company men (Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford), along with a large cadre of technicians, accountants, interns, and various other drones, are hard at work, doing—well, if I told you what they were doing, someone (not me) would presumably have to kill you.

Read more. [Image: Lionsgate]

A message from this Joss Whedon fanboy to Tumblr: The Cabin in the Woods is excellent.

Washington Post:

New Van Gogh painting discovered

X-ray technology has revealed that a painting dismissed as the work of an unknown artist is actually by Vincent Van Gogh. “Still Life with Meadow Flowers and Roses,” which hangs in the Kroeller-Mueller Museum in the Netherlands, was examined and an underpainting of two wrestlers was revealed underneath the flowers. This allowed historians to confirm that the painting is by Van Gogh, the AP reports.

The painting was originally thought to be by Van Gogh, but it was dismissed from his catalogue in 2003 after doubts about its origins. It was thought to be too large, with the signature in the wrong corner. The painting was created during a period during which the artist lived with his brother in Paris, beginning in 1886. Letters from Van Gogh to his brother mention the painting of the wrestlers, which helped historians put the clues together.

This discovery follows last week’s revelation that a fresco by Leonardo da Vinci may have been found behind a false wall in Florence’s Palazzo Vecchio. Researchers have drilled holes in an existing fresco on the false wall, and discovered an air pocket that may lead to da Vinci’s ““The Battle of Anghiari.&

usagov:

Image Description: Curators prep and test displays from the Art of Video Games exhibit, which opened at the Smithsonian American Art Museum on Friday, March 16. For videos, a list of the featured games, interviews with curators, and a schedule where the show will be travelling in the future, visit the official exhibit site.

Photos from the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Take that, Roger Ebert!

This was made in MS Paint. This is how.

This was made in MS Paint. This is how.

discoverynews:

treehugger:

“This one above looks to me like a flying cat with wings who’s carrying a whip. So deep.”
(via Tiny Crab Unintentionally Makes Awesome Sand Art (Photos) : TreeHugger)
CRABS made this!! Watch the video to find out how.

Welcome TreeHugger.com to Tumblr! An important follow.

discoverynews:

treehugger:

“This one above looks to me like a flying cat with wings who’s carrying a whip. So deep.”

(via Tiny Crab Unintentionally Makes Awesome Sand Art (Photos) : TreeHugger)

CRABS made this!! Watch the video to find out how.

Welcome TreeHugger.com to Tumblr! An important follow.

Tags: nature crabs art