(Source: theonion)

motherjones:


Nous sommes tous Deadspin.



Link to actual tweet.

motherjones:

Nous sommes tous Deadspin.

shortformblog:

dailydot:

That awkward moment when the Senior Vice President of Design at Chrysler (which owns Jeep) calls you out on Twitter.

The Detroit Free Press has a great piece breaking down the epic-ness of this moment.

shortformblog:

dailydot:

That awkward moment when the Senior Vice President of Design at Chrysler (which owns Jeep) calls you out on Twitter.

The Detroit Free Press has a great piece breaking down the epic-ness of this moment.

shortformblog:

gawkercom:

Donald Trump—ever vigilant—has stepped into the breach and taken decisive action in the wake of last night’s disaster.

Dear Donald: Are your hotels like troll lairs? We’ve never been. We much prefer this idea:

RT if you think Donald Trump was protected from the elements by his fortress of money.

You make the assumption that Trump is financially able to write a $5 million check to any charity.

shortformblog:

gawkercom:

Donald Trump—ever vigilant—has stepped into the breach and taken decisive action in the wake of last night’s disaster.

Dear Donald: Are your hotels like troll lairs? We’ve never been. We much prefer this idea:

RT if you think Donald Trump was protected from the elements by his fortress of money.

You make the assumption that Trump is financially able to write a $5 million check to any charity.

The Alliance

The Alliance

producermatthew:

Faking it: Reality television star and real estate mogul Donald Trump has accused President Barack Obama of releasing a doctored birth certificate. Trump claims to have hired a computer forensic expert who determined the certificate was not authentic.

What in the fucking fuck.

producermatthew:

Faking it: Reality television star and real estate mogul Donald Trump has accused President Barack Obama of releasing a doctored birth certificate. Trump claims to have hired a computer forensic expert who determined the certificate was not authentic.

What in the fucking fuck.

(Source: matthewkeys)

robertreich:

One of my regrets in life is losing the chance to debate Mitt Romney and whip his ass.

It was the fall of 2002. Mitt had thundered into Massachusetts with enough money to grab the Republican nomination for governor. Meanwhile, I was doing my best to secure the Democratic nomination. One week before the Democratic primary I was tied in the polls with the state treasurer, according to the Boston Herald, well ahead of four other candidates. But my campaign ran out of cash. Despite pleas from my campaign manager, I didn’t want to put a second mortgage on the family home. The rest is history: The state treasurer got the nomination, I never got to debate Mitt, and Mitt won the election.

With Trump, Gingrich, Bachmann, and possibly Palin now in the race for the Republican presidential nomination, “GOP” is starting to mean Goofy, Outrageous, and Peculiar. Mitt would pose the most serious challenge to a second Obama term. 

I say this not because Mitt’s mind is the sharpest of the likely contenders (Gingrich is far more nimble intellectually). Nor because his record of public service is particularly impressive (Tim Pawlenty took his governorship seriously while Mitt as governor seemed more intent on burnishing his Republican credentials outside Massachusetts). Nor because Mitt is the most experienced at running a business (Donald Trump has managed a giant company while Mitt made his money buying and selling companies.)* Nor, finally, because he’s especially charismatic or entertaining (Sarah Palin can work up audiences and Mike Huckabee is genuinely funny and folksy, while Mitt delivers a speech so laboriously he seems to be driving a large truck).

Mitt Romney’s great strength is he looks, sounds, and acts presidential.

Policy wonks like me want to believe the public pays most attention to candidates’ platforms and policy positions. Again and again we’re proven wrong. Unless a candidate is way out of the mainstream (Barry Goldwater and George McGovern come to mind), the public tends to vote for the person who makes them feel safest at a visceral level, who reassures them he’ll take best care of the country – not because of what he says but because of how he says it.

In this regard, looks matter. Taller candidates almost always win over shorter ones (meaning even if I’d whipped him in a debate, Romney would probably still have won the governorship). Good-looking ones with great smiles garner more votes than those who scowl or perspire (Kennedy versus Nixon), thin ones are elected over fat ones (William Howard Taft to the contrary notwithstanding), and the bald need not apply (would Eisenhower have made it if Stevenson had been blessed with a thick shock?).

Voices also matter. Deeper registers signal gravitas; higher and more nasal emanations don’t command nearly as much respect (think of Reagan versus Carter, or Obama versus McCain).

And behavior matters. Voters prefer candidates who appear even-tempered and comfortable with themselves (this was Obama’s strongest advantage over John McCain in 2008). They also favor the candidate who projects the most confidence and optimism (think FDR, Reagan, and Bill Clinton).

Romney has it all. Plus a strong jaw, gleaming white teeth, and perfect posture. No other Republican hopeful comes close.

What does Mitt stand for? It’s a mystery — other than a smaller government is good and the Obama administration is bad. Of all the Republican hopefuls, Romney has most assiduously avoided taking positions. He’s written two books but I challenge anyone to find a clear policy in either. Both books are so hedged, conditioned, boring and bland that once you put them down you can’t pick them up.

Mitt is reputed to say whatever an audience wants to hear, but that’s not quite right. In reality he says nothing, but does it in such way audiences believe they’ve heard what they want to hear. He is the chameleon candidate. To call Mitt Romney an empty suit is an insult to suits.

Yet Romney is gaining ground over Obama. According to the most recent Marist poll, in a hypothetical presidential matchup Obama now holds a one percent point lead over Romney,  46 to 45. In January, Obama led Romney by 13 points.

Why is Mitt doing so well? Partly because Obama’s positions are by now well known, while voters can project anything they want on to Mitt. It’s also because much of the public continues to worry about the economy, jobs, and the price of gas at the pump, and they inevitably blame the President.

But I suspect something else is at work here, too. To many voters, President Obama sounds and acts presidential but he doesn’t look it. Mitt Romney is the perfect candidate for people uncomfortable that their president is black. Mitt is their great white hope.

*My only issue with this commentary has to do with this point about Trump.

While Trump may manage a giant corporation, the Trump Organization has routinely filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, in 1991, 1992, 2004 and 2009, because of his poor management. He works a good shell game of spending loosely, driving his company - and those connected to it - into debt, restructuring under Chapter 11 and doing the whole process again.

In contrast, while Romney did work in buying and selling companies, he also worked in bringing companies and other enterprises away from bankruptcy, most prominently the 2002 Salt Lake Games.

I’m sure Reich will disagree with me on Romney’s business credentials, but he won’t be able to convince me that Trump is a better businessman.

Of course, don’t take this to mean that I support Romney. I believe he is the best, as in most able to challenge Obama, of the 2012 GOP field, and I believe he would have put up a better challenge to Obama in 2008, especially given his business history and the circumstances of that fall. But his inconsistencies in numerous policy positions and willingness to adopt radically new beliefs - and overexuberance in doing so - irk me towards mistrust.

Trump: ‘I Am The Least Racist Person There Is’; Because A Black Guy Won The Apprentice Six Years Ago

TRUMP: Well, you know, when it comes to racism and racists, I am the least racist person there is. And I think most people would me would tell you that. I am the least racist I’ve had great relationships. In fact, Randal Pinkett won, as you know, on The Apprentice a little while ago, a couple of years ago. And Randall’s been outstanding in every way. So I am the least racist person.

In this one minute clip, he works in several mentions of his show. I don’t understand how anyone believes he’s a serious candidate and isn’t just doing this for the free publicity.


TRUMP: […] You know, there’s a great American movie called “Citizen Kane.” It’s about a man who kicks ass and makes a ton of money. I haven’t seen the ending of this movie, but I assume it ends with him happy and President. I wanna be your Citizen Trump. And if you criticize me, just remember: you’re rubber and I’m gold, so whatever you say doesn’t matter, because I’m gold and you’re losers. [turns to Palin] Except you. Sarah Palin, I like you.

TRUMP: […] You know, there’s a great American movie called “Citizen Kane.” It’s about a man who kicks ass and makes a ton of money. I haven’t seen the ending of this movie, but I assume it ends with him happy and President. I wanna be your Citizen Trump. And if you criticize me, just remember: you’re rubber and I’m gold, so whatever you say doesn’t matter, because I’m gold and you’re losers. [turns to Palin] Except you. Sarah Palin, I like you.

(via theheartacheandthehope)

motherjones:

WaPo poll: Number of Birthers Plummets
Get your steaming hot cup of justice over here.

Donald Trump is proud of himself for leading the way in proving President Obama was born in the US.

motherjones:

WaPo poll: Number of Birthers Plummets

Get your steaming hot cup of justice over here.

Donald Trump is proud of himself for leading the way in proving President Obama was born in the US.

"It’s like in golf. A lot of people - I don’t want this to sound trivial - but a lot of people are switching to these really long putters, very unattractive. It’s weird. You see these great players with these really long putters, because they can’t sink three-footers anymore. And, I hate it. I am a traditionalist. I have so many fabulous friends who happen to be gay, but I am a traditionalist."

Donald Trump giving his thoughts on those “who happen to be gay,” gay marriage and, apparently, golf.

(Source: The New York Times)

THIS.

THIS.

No major sport has a longer off-season than professional football. From the end of the Super Bowl in early February until the next kickoff in early September, NFL fans are left to endure seven months of pigskin Siberia every year. (And this year, thanks to the league’s labor problems, the wait could be much, much longer.)

For this we can blame Donald Trump.

For a few years in the mid-1980s, America was actually blessed with two viable professional football leagues: The NFL played in the fall, while the fledgling United States Football League took the spring months. Launched in 1983, the USFL was a cut or two above most second-tier pro leagues. It enjoyed national television contracts with ABC and ESPN (then a newcomer to the sports world itself) and attracted some elite playing and coaching talent. After winning the Heisman Trophy at the University of Georgia in 1982, for instance, running back Herschel Walker spurned the NFL for a contract with the USFL’s New Jersey Generals.

For three seasons, the crowds were good, ratings were decent, and spirits were high. But then the USFL’s owners made a fatal mistake: They listened to The Donald, who had purchased the Generals in the league’s second year of operation. Trump pressured his fellow owners to move their schedule to the fall in order to compete head to head with the NFL. It was an act of suicide. Ultimately, the USFL staked its future on an antitrust suit against the NFL, which ended with a Pyrrhic victory (a judgment for $3) that finished off the upstart league for good.

Filmmaker Mike Tollin, who ran the USFL’s equivalent of NFL Film back in the ’80s, told this story in “Small Potatoes,” a 2009 documentary that was part of ESPN’s “30 for 30” series. One of the highlights of the movie is Tollin’s interview with Trump, who arrives for the taping in a combative mood, provides a series of hostile answers and then storms off the set. When the film debuted in October ‘09, Trump publicly ripped it as “third rate” and attacked Tollin as “a sad guy.” (He also sent a note to Tollin with this handwritten postscript: “You are a loser.”)

Wonkette:

Days After Birth Certificate, Obama Walks Into New Conspiracy Theory
Now that Osama bin Laden is dead, President Obama’s birth certificate is out of the news, and so is Donald Trump, whose teevee show was pre-empted last night before America could find out what’s really important, which celebrity performed poorly in a fake business game. But that’s okay, because bin Laden’s death is a prime breeding ground for new conspiracy theories, and the press is salivating.
The Washington Post has this online article, which offers crazy peoplesuggestions on where to base their new theories.

Buried at SeaBin Laden was reportedly transported from Pakistan and “buried at sea,” although it’s not clear in what body of water, according to a U.S. official. The Post reports that the U.S. government did not want there to be a gravesite that could be used as a shrine. Some conspiracy theorists doubt that bin Laden is dead because the body was disposed of so quickly. Others take issue with the lack of photographic evidence.
‘Mission Accomplished’ AnniversaryYesterday was the eighth anniversary of President George W. Bush’s so-called “Mission Accomplished” speech. To some, this coincidence is an opportunity to use “Mission Accomplished” as a rallying cry — to show that almost 10 years after 9/11, the mastermind of the attack is dead. Others may see this as not a coincidence, but a carefully planned public relations act.

Sure, thanks, Post.
The U.S. is actually probably planning to release photos of bin Laden soon to quell suspicion. But that will probably set the conspiracy theories in motion more than anything, because people have never found an image of bin Laden they really liked, have they? There’s always argument over whether “it’s really him.” The U.S. could probably get more people to believe they killed bin Laden by releasing photos of a dead drag queen than putting out the images of his actual body.
People who hate Obama will find an excuse to say he’s still a secret Muslim and played no part in killing bin Laden. And that’s what separates us from Al Qaeda: We have the freedom to believe whatever we want in this country, even if it’s an obvious and fundamentally disgusting lie.

Wonkette:

Days After Birth Certificate, Obama Walks Into New Conspiracy Theory

Now that Osama bin Laden is dead, President Obama’s birth certificate is out of the news, and so is Donald Trump, whose teevee show was pre-empted last night before America could find out what’s really important, which celebrity performed poorly in a fake business game. But that’s okay, because bin Laden’s death is a prime breeding ground for new conspiracy theories, and the press is salivating.

The Washington Post has this online article, which offers crazy peoplesuggestions on where to base their new theories.

Buried at Sea
Bin Laden was reportedly transported from Pakistan and “buried at sea,” although it’s not clear in what body of water, according to a U.S. official. The Post reports that the U.S. government did not want there to be a gravesite that could be used as a shrine. Some conspiracy theorists doubt that bin Laden is dead because the body was disposed of so quickly. Others take issue with the lack of photographic evidence.

‘Mission Accomplished’ Anniversary
Yesterday was the eighth anniversary of President George W. Bush’s so-called “Mission Accomplished” speech. To some, this coincidence is an opportunity to use “Mission Accomplished” as a rallying cry — to show that almost 10 years after 9/11, the mastermind of the attack is dead. Others may see this as not a coincidence, but a carefully planned public relations act.

Sure, thanks, Post.

The U.S. is actually probably planning to release photos of bin Laden soon to quell suspicion. But that will probably set the conspiracy theories in motion more than anything, because people have never found an image of bin Laden they really liked, have they? There’s always argument over whether “it’s really him.” The U.S. could probably get more people to believe they killed bin Laden by releasing photos of a dead drag queen than putting out the images of his actual body.

People who hate Obama will find an excuse to say he’s still a secret Muslim and played no part in killing bin Laden. And that’s what separates us from Al Qaeda: We have the freedom to believe whatever we want in this country, even if it’s an obvious and fundamentally disgusting lie.