Google Street View Hyperlapse

Hyper-lapse photography – a technique combining time-lapse and sweeping camera movements typically focused on a point-of-interest – has been a growing trend on video sites. It’s not hard to find stunning examples on Vimeo. Creating them requires precision and many hours stitching together photos taken from carefully mapped locations. We aimed at making the process simpler by using Google Street View as an aid, but quickly discovered that it could be used as the source material. It worked so well, we decided to design a very usable UI around our engine and release Google Street View Hyperlapse.

The site settings are purposely low (like having a maximum of 60 frames per animation) for greater accessibility. However, all the source code is available on Github (including examples and documentation) so developers can play with higher frame rates, better image quality, and more complicated camera movements.

How it started

The idea for this project came from one of our motion designers, Jonas, as part of his Labs experiment. He wanted to explore a tool that could help him create hyper-lapse videos with the assistance of available data sets and emerging technology. We built the tool – he built a video with it. The results are pretty stunning.

[x]

[x]

"We launched Google Reader in 2005 in an effort to make it easy for people to discover and keep tabs on their favorite websites. While the product has a loyal following, over the years usage has declined. So, on July 1, 2013, we will retire Google Reader. Users and developers interested in RSS alternatives can export their data, including their subscriptions, with Google Takeout over the course of the next four months."

Google is shutting down Google Reader, because they are stupid. (via shortformblog)

Noooooooo!

(via popculturebrain)

Wait, first Tweetdeck is being taken away, and now this? 

Actually, I have no rage against this as I’ve never used RSS feeds for anything in my life. However, my friend swears by NewsBlur.

(via christopherhuff)

I HATE this.

(via mchughla)

Dammit Google.

(via mchughla)

Google shows off the many features of its augmented reality project Google Glass.

futurejournalismproject:

ReadWrite’s Dan Lyons points to a disturbing trend in tech journalism as he tries to unwrap why iPhones have such significant US marketshare while the rest of the world runs 75% Android.

Android, goes a coverage tick, is for poor people:

But Apple and its cheerleaders in the States don’t just criticize Android phones; they also criticize Android users, depicting them as low-class people who are uneducated, poor, cheap and too lacking in “taste” (a favorite Apple fanboy word) to pay for an Apple product and instead willing to settle for a low-price knockoff.

See, for example, a recent story by Sam Biddle on Gizmodo called “Android Is Popular Because It’s Cheap, Not Because It’s Good,” illustrated with a photo of a homeless man sleeping next to a shopping cart and bags full of collected cans. Nice touch!… Apparently inspired by this article, John Biggs of TechCrunch picked up the “Android is cheap” meme and ran with it too…

…[I]n America, a noisy chorus of pro-Apple bloggers keeps repeating the mantra about Android being cheap and crappy and second-rate, and people keep believing it and insisting that they must have an iPhone. American consumers have been told that those Android smartphones are hard to use, or complicated, or geeky, or unreliable, and, worst of all, on top of all that, they’re made for poor people. 

And that’s where the rhetoric starts to border on something ugly. Look at what Apple fans were saying in April 2012 when Instagram became available on Android. Cult of Mac had a nice roundup which included sneering tweets about Walmart and “poor peasants” and “riff raff” and “poor people,” but also included these:

  • “It’s like when all the ghetto people started coming to the nice suburbs. Instagram was our nice lil suburb.”
  • “Instagram just got a whole lotta ghetto.”

The italics are mine, and I’ve added them for a reason. Yes, it’s the dreaded G word, and it comes up again in a Dec. 13, 2011 article by Glenn Derene, who wrote that “Android’s Cheap, Low Quality Apps Make It Feel Like A Technological Ghetto.”

Related: Henry Blodget, founder of Business Insider, writes about the horrors of flying economy. Evidently, he couldn’t charge his laptop, there was no wifi and the food was bad.


Ingress: Foursquare with space noises.
Boston, MA, is closer Uiramutã, Brazil, (2696.649 miles) than it is to Santa Cruz, CA (2698.642 miles).
Calculations, and image, via Google Maps Distance Calculator.

Boston, MA, is closer Uiramutã, Brazil, (2696.649 miles) than it is to Santa Cruz, CA (2698.642 miles).

Calculations, and image, via Google Maps Distance Calculator.

"We have not done anything yet."

Google CEO Eric Schmidt responds to a question in Tokyo regarding whether the company is developing a Google Maps app for iOS 6.

Bacon

Coworker: This should fill up my last couple of minutes.

Me: oracleofbacon.org is better

Coworker: Wow. I didnt know you could be elitist about this.

Me: It is. With Oracle of Bacon you can find out how far everyone is from Kevin Bacon and you can also find out how far someone is from someone else who isn’t Kevin Bacon.

If you wanted to know the Bacon Number between Jamie Kennedy and Cary Grant, for example.

It’s 3.

election:

Search Interest in Clinton DNC speech via Google

election:

Search Interest in Clinton DNC speech via Google

(Source: gov, via ilovecharts)

"By taking detailed pictures of individuals in intimate locations such as around a pool, or in their backyard, or even through their windows, these programs have the potential to put private images on public display. We need to hit the pause button here and figure out what is happening and how we can best protect peoples’ privacy, without unduly impeding technological advancement."

Sen. Charles Schumer • Arguing that Google and Apple’s separate, upcoming 3D aerial maps raise major privacy concerns. He even wrote an open letter to the companies on the matter, which features this all-caps scare message: “TECHNOLOGY STRONG ENOUGH TO SEE THROUGH WINDOWS AND EVEN CATCH SUN BATHERS IN BACK YARDS” Problem is, Schumer appears to be citing a Daily Mail report on the matter that suggested that “military grade” spy planes were used to get this data, despite the fact that appears to not be the case. Google, in fact, responded, suggesting Schumer misunderstood the technology. “We currently don’t blur aerial imagery because the resolution isn’t sharp enough for it to be a concern,” a spokesperson said in a statement. (via shortformblog)

This is what happens when we have people making laws about technologies they do not understand nor make an attempt to understand.

(via shortformblog)

spiegelman:

minusmanhattan:

Yesterday Google announced they had mapped out parts of the Amazon that you can now navigate on Google Street View. 

Check it out.

Google, taking the mystery out of the world since 2000.

Cannot wait for Google to start mapping the canyons of Mars.

(via npr)

Google 2012
Redditor Ulto has a question:

Anyone else wish google would actually do what the picture shows to raise awareness tomorrow?

Google 2012

Redditor Ulto has a question:

Anyone else wish google would actually do what the picture shows to raise awareness tomorrow?

Friend: one time I looked at a place that would have been me renting a room from a house inhabited by an old lady and the kitchen ceiling was covered with tin foil and I was scared. Renting a room in a house, not from a house
Me: I thought the house might have been sentient. Then you destroyed that dream of mine. Thank you.
Friend: You know it would probably be easier if you could just rent a room from a robot house. Then if there are any problems it could fix itself internally, immediately.
Me: And be much more fun.
Friend: Of course, it would be impossible to get away with violating the lease.
Me: If the house was good and didn’t try to screw me over, then it’d be okay.
Friend: Yeah it would have to be like an Apple or Honda built robot I would trust that. Or Google.
Me: I would trust Google in partnership with Honda.
Friend: Definitely. Apple would make the living experience elegant and intuitive though.
Me: I’d still enjoy a Google/Honda house more.
Friend: I would trade living in reality for living in a suspended state and experiencing an Apple-designed reality.
Me: I would trade living in reality for living in a designed reality no matter what. This world sucks. I want a better user experience. PUT ME BACK IN THE MATRIX.

Friend: one time I looked at a place that would have been me renting a room from a house inhabited by an old lady and the kitchen ceiling was covered with tin foil and I was scared. Renting a room in a house, not from a house

Me: I thought the house might have been sentient. Then you destroyed that dream of mine. Thank you.

Friend: You know it would probably be easier if you could just rent a room from a robot house. Then if there are any problems it could fix itself internally, immediately.

Me: And be much more fun.

Friend: Of course, it would be impossible to get away with violating the lease.

Me: If the house was good and didn’t try to screw me over, then it’d be okay.

Friend: Yeah it would have to be like an Apple or Honda built robot I would trust that. Or Google.

Me: I would trust Google in partnership with Honda.

Friend: Definitely. Apple would make the living experience elegant and intuitive though.

Me: I’d still enjoy a Google/Honda house more.

Friend: I would trade living in reality for living in a suspended state and experiencing an Apple-designed reality.

Me: I would trade living in reality for living in a designed reality no matter what. This world sucks. I want a better user experience. PUT ME BACK IN THE MATRIX.

shortformblog:

popculturebrain:

inothernews:

Google marks what would have been stop-motion clay animation pioneer Art Cloakey’s 90th birthday.

And it’s fully interactive, of course.

Somehow cooler than the Muppet one. Surprisingly.

shortformblog:

popculturebrain:

inothernews:

Google marks what would have been stop-motion clay animation pioneer Art Cloakey’s 90th birthday.

And it’s fully interactive, of course.

Somehow cooler than the Muppet one. Surprisingly.

(via shortformblog)