Journalists Brief Security Council for First Time
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Four journalists addressing the U.N. Security Council Wednesday said world leaders should do more to protect reporters risking their lives in conflict situations with one foreign correspondent calling for protections similar to those afforded to international diplomats.
NBC’s chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel said that protecting journalists today is perhaps harder than ever “because you have to tackle the question of who is a journalist and who is an activist in a way that never existed before.”
"We’re all bloggers and punks and rebels with cameras. There is absolutely no respect for career journalists anymore," said Engel, who was kidnapped by pro-regime gunmen in northern Syria and held for five days in Dec. 2012.
Engel told council ambassadors that professional journalists should be recognized, “and just like you in the diplomatic community need protection to be objective, if you want professionals who are also objective, we need protection as well.”
Associated Press Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll, vice chairwoman of the Committee to Protect Journalists, said that reporters serve as the public’s eyes and ears in conflict situations by going to places and asking questions that most people cannot.
"An attack on a journalist is a proxy for an attack on the ordinary citizen, an attack on that citizen’s right to information about their communities and their institutions" and their world, she said.
The council invited journalists to brief members for the first time at the invitation of the United States, which holds the Security Council presidency this month.
U.N. Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson opened the meeting by decrying the killing of more than 600 journalists in the past decade, including 41 in Syria last year including those who were using social media.
While the council, which deals with threats to international peace and security, was focusing on threats to journalists in armed conflict, Eliasson said journalists in many non-conflict situations around the world have also been killed and are at grave risk.
According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, “most murdered journalists — 5 in 6 — are killed in their own hometowns covering local stories — crime and corruption,” Carroll said.

Journalists Brief Security Council for First Time

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Four journalists addressing the U.N. Security Council Wednesday said world leaders should do more to protect reporters risking their lives in conflict situations with one foreign correspondent calling for protections similar to those afforded to international diplomats.

NBC’s chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel said that protecting journalists today is perhaps harder than ever “because you have to tackle the question of who is a journalist and who is an activist in a way that never existed before.”

"We’re all bloggers and punks and rebels with cameras. There is absolutely no respect for career journalists anymore," said Engel, who was kidnapped by pro-regime gunmen in northern Syria and held for five days in Dec. 2012.

Engel told council ambassadors that professional journalists should be recognized, “and just like you in the diplomatic community need protection to be objective, if you want professionals who are also objective, we need protection as well.”

Associated Press Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll, vice chairwoman of the Committee to Protect Journalists, said that reporters serve as the public’s eyes and ears in conflict situations by going to places and asking questions that most people cannot.

"An attack on a journalist is a proxy for an attack on the ordinary citizen, an attack on that citizen’s right to information about their communities and their institutions" and their world, she said.

The council invited journalists to brief members for the first time at the invitation of the United States, which holds the Security Council presidency this month.

U.N. Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson opened the meeting by decrying the killing of more than 600 journalists in the past decade, including 41 in Syria last year including those who were using social media.

While the council, which deals with threats to international peace and security, was focusing on threats to journalists in armed conflict, Eliasson said journalists in many non-conflict situations around the world have also been killed and are at grave risk.

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, “most murdered journalists — 5 in 6 — are killed in their own hometowns covering local stories — crime and corruption,” Carroll said.

Romenesko:

UPDATE: Chicago Tribune media reporter Robert Channick has also tweeted the news and reports the Sun-Times “plans to use freelancers going forward.”

UPDATE 2: From a Sun-Times Media Group employee: “Photog email accounts are already shut down…emails to our photo staff just got returned…this is bananas.”

shortformblog:

On the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, we’re revisiting this video, which we first posted several months ago — it’s NBC News’ Chief Foreign Correspondent, Richard Engel, detailing to MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow the horrifying tale of how he was abducted by pro-Assad forces within Syria, and how he came to be freed. Engel is one of the lucky ones (extremely lucky, considering the content of his story) — 23 professional journalists have been killed covering the civil war, the majority of them Syrian, on top of dozens more slain citizen journalists. 

pulitzercenter:

 futurejournalismproject:

Wonder what’s going on in the world and how to find out about it?
See yesterday’s Doonesbury and know you’re not alone.
Click to embiggen.

You’re not alone – you can always come to http://pulitzercenter.org to find out what’s going on in the world!  

pulitzercenter:

 futurejournalismproject:

Wonder what’s going on in the world and how to find out about it?

See yesterday’s Doonesbury and know you’re not alone.

Click to embiggen.

You’re not alone  you can always come to http://pulitzercenter.org to find out what’s going on in the world!  

futurejournalismproject:

An editor at the Guardian argues that newspapers should be funded by a tax on internet service providers, because public journalism needs to be supported. But there are a host of flaws with the idea, including the fact that large newspapers are not synonymous with journalism.

theatlantic:

On Being the Lady with the Microphone, by Carole Simpson

Way back in 1992 I became the first woman and first minority to moderate a presidential debate. This past summer I was constantly asked, “Why hasn’t another woman moderated a presidential debate?”
Why people thought I had the answer, I don’t know. It should have been directed to the Commission on Presidential Debates. Supported by the Republican and Democratic Parties, the Commission has been responsible for producing the debates since 1987. Together with campaign officials for the candidates, Commission members decide the dates, locations, formats and moderators for the one debate for vice president and the three for president.
Allow me to point out here that of the 17 members most are male and white. Only two women serve on the Commission. Perhaps a problem?

Read more. [Image: C-SPAN]

I think the biggest problem regarding the debates is that the parties control them rather than an independent, non-partisan organization, such as the League of Women Voters, which ran the 1976, 1980 and 1984 debates. The LWV pulled out of debate sponsorship in 1988 with this statement from League President Nancy M. Neuman:

"The League of Women Voters is withdrawing its sponsorship of the presidential debate scheduled for mid-October because the demands of the two campaign organizations would perpetrate a fraud on the American voter.
"It has become clear to us that the candidates’ organizations aim to add debates to their list of campaign-trail charades devoid of substance, spontaneity and honest answers to tough questions. The League has no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking of the American public."

theatlantic:

On Being the Lady with the Microphone, by Carole Simpson

Way back in 1992 I became the first woman and first minority to moderate a presidential debate. This past summer I was constantly asked, “Why hasn’t another woman moderated a presidential debate?”

Why people thought I had the answer, I don’t know. It should have been directed to the Commission on Presidential Debates. Supported by the Republican and Democratic Parties, the Commission has been responsible for producing the debates since 1987. Together with campaign officials for the candidates, Commission members decide the dates, locations, formats and moderators for the one debate for vice president and the three for president.

Allow me to point out here that of the 17 members most are male and white. Only two women serve on the Commission. Perhaps a problem?

Read more. [Image: C-SPAN]

I think the biggest problem regarding the debates is that the parties control them rather than an independent, non-partisan organization, such as the League of Women Voters, which ran the 1976, 1980 and 1984 debates. The LWV pulled out of debate sponsorship in 1988 with this statement from League President Nancy M. Neuman:

"The League of Women Voters is withdrawing its sponsorship of the presidential debate scheduled for mid-October because the demands of the two campaign organizations would perpetrate a fraud on the American voter.

"It has become clear to us that the candidates’ organizations aim to add debates to their list of campaign-trail charades devoid of substance, spontaneity and honest answers to tough questions. The League has no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking of the American public."

motherjones:

Michael Jordan = “failed baseball player”
Carmelo Anthony = “noted anti-police activist”
… UM …
Fox Nation = “notorious race-baiting troll site”
(via)
UPDATE: Fox Nation = “unoriginal notorious race-baiting troll site,” which bogarted this from the “aspiring online rag” Washington Free Beacon.

motherjones:

Michael Jordan = “failed baseball player”

Carmelo Anthony = “noted anti-police activist”

… UM …

Fox Nation = “notorious race-baiting troll site”

(via)

UPDATE: Fox Nation = “unoriginal notorious race-baiting troll site,” which bogarted this from the “aspiring online rag” Washington Free Beacon.

"Being fact-checked is not very fun. Good fact-checkers have a preternatural inclination toward pedantry, and sometimes will address you in a prosecutorial tone. That is their job and the adversarial tone is even more important than the actual facts they correct. In my experience, seeing your name on the cover of a magazine will take you far in the journey toward believing your own bullshit. It is human to do so, and fact-checkers serve as a valuable check to prevent writers from lapsing into the kind of arrogant laziness which breeds plagiarism and the manufacture of facts. The fact-checker (and the copy-editor too actually) is a dam against you embarrassing yourself, or worse, being so arrogant that don’t even realize you’ve embarrassed yourself. Put differently, a culture of fact-checking, of honesty, is as important as the actual fact-checking."

Ta-Nehisi Coates, in praise of fact checkers. (via theatlantic)

(via theatlantic)

"Some part of all of us wants to be credited and enjoys the acclaim. And a big part of all of us likes getting answers. But we now live in a world where counter-intuitive bullshitting is valorized, where the pose of argument is more important than the actual pursuit of truth, where clever answers take precedence over profound questions. We have no patience for mystery. We want the deciphering of gods. We want oracles. And we want all of it right now."

Ta-Nehisi Coates on journalism, Jonah Lehrer, and the truth. (via theatlantic)

(via npr)

All in a day’s work

npr:

A slideshow of reporters LITERALLY SPRINTING to get the SCOTUS decision out yesterday/possible product placement should any of these sneaker brands choose to take up the mantle of “pressed journalists’ footwear of choice.”
—Daisy

This is fantastic.

Journalism.

Journalism.

"It was clearly something that he was familiar with and I wasn’t. I didn’t know. I didn’t know that this went on."

— Journalist Jeremy Paxman • Testifying before the Leveson inquiry, about an event he attended during 2002, during which then Daily Mail editor Piers Morgan taught him about phone hacking. Paxman told British officials that Morgan’s openness was “quite shocking”, particularly when it came to gaining and maintaining access to phones. “[Morgan explained] that the way to get access to people’s messages was was go to the factory default setting and press either 0000 or 1234,” testified Paxman, adding, “if you didn’t put on your own code… his words: “You’re a fool.” Unsurprisingly, Piers Morgan was less than pleased with Paxman’s testimony. source (viafollow)

motherjones:

onthemedia:

Pulitzer prize winning reporter Charlie LeDuff left the New York Times to cover his hometown, Detroit (our interview about that is here). Now, he’s reporting for the local Fox affiliate, where he produced maybe our favorite local newscast story ever.

Sexting, shameless judge + a reporter doing stand-ups in Ray-Bans + a distorted voice modulator interview = our favorite non-MCA related thing on the internet today.

In addition to producing this truly fantastic local news item, Charlie LeDuff also wrote one of our all-time favorite pieces of reporting.

Wow. This is awesome.

Because they were called assassins.

(via theatlantic)