aljazeeraamerica:

'Go Home Terrorist:' Sikh children bullied twice the national average

Half of Sikh children reported that they are bullied in school, according to a study released Thursday – a number that rises to more than two-thirds if they wear a turban that covers their long, uncut hair in accordance with their religion.
The study also found that Sept. 11, 2001 attacks are an important factor driving persecution of children wearing traditional garb. They endure bullying rates twice the national average, the report found.
“For two years we got bullied, came home crying every day,” a Sikh student, who is identified only by his initials LS, said in the report, titled Go Home Terrorist. “I was in 5th grade [in California], and my dad took us to a barber shop, and he was like ‘it’s today.’ My mom was crying, my dad was crying.” It was the day he cut his hair.
Continue reading

(Photo: Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images)

aljazeeraamerica:

'Go Home Terrorist:' Sikh children bullied twice the national average

Half of Sikh children reported that they are bullied in school, according to a study released Thursday – a number that rises to more than two-thirds if they wear a turban that covers their long, uncut hair in accordance with their religion.

The study also found that Sept. 11, 2001 attacks are an important factor driving persecution of children wearing traditional garb. They endure bullying rates twice the national average, the report found.

“For two years we got bullied, came home crying every day,” a Sikh student, who is identified only by his initials LS, said in the report, titled Go Home Terrorist. “I was in 5th grade [in California], and my dad took us to a barber shop, and he was like ‘it’s today.’ My mom was crying, my dad was crying.” It was the day he cut his hair.

Continue reading

(Photo: Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post/Getty Images)

motherjones:

Argentina’s Dirty War is hilarious, according to inexplicably influential Internet person.
(As for the context, try this.)

motherjones:

Argentina’s Dirty War is hilarious, according to inexplicably influential Internet person.

(As for the context, try this.)

Waiting.

Waiting.

"I wish to take this opportunity to admit that there have been times that my sexual conduct has fallen below the standards expected of me as a priest, archbishop and cardinal."

— Recently resigned Cardinal Keith O’Brien. As Archbishop of St. Andrews and Edinburgh, O’Brien had been the highest ranking Roman Catholic cleric in Great Britain.

(Source: BBC)

Jesus. Christ.

Jesus. Christ.

"We ask why there is violence in our schools, but we’ve systematically removed God from our schools."

–Mike Huckabee, discussing today’s shooting in Connecticut. (via officialssay)

Also, the American Family Association’s Bryan Fischer:

The question’s going to come up: ‘Where was God? I thought God cared about the little children. God protected the little children. Where was God when all this went down.’ And, here’s the bottom line: God is not going to go where he is not wanted.

Sun-Sentinel:


'Festivus' pole goes up next to Nativity in Deerfield
DEERFIELD BEACH - Mary, Joseph and Baby Jesus have graced the corner of Hillsboro Boulevard and Federal Highway every December for more than 20 years.
This year, they’re joined by an 8-foot-tall aluminum Festivus Pole, symbol of a Dec. 23 atheist “holiday” that became a pop culture hit after being featured in a “Seinfeld” episode.
"It’s just 23 beer cans stacked 8 feet high and conveniently located 6 feet from Baby Jesus," said activist blogger Chaz Stevens, who installed it Thursday with the city’s permission.
Stevens said he has been trying unsuccessfully for five years to get the city to take down the Nativity scene. So this year he asked for space to express his own unreligious beliefs.
"Think of how many people have died over the years to give us our freedoms," Stevens said. "So I’ve got to push back a little."
City Attorney Andrew Maroudis declined to comment.
But Marc Rohr, a law professor at Nova Southeastern University called the display an unusual move. “I think the atheists of the world are more interested in preventing religious displays than in joining them.”


No shit, Professor Rohr.

Sun-Sentinel:

'Festivus' pole goes up next to Nativity in Deerfield

DEERFIELD BEACH - Mary, Joseph and Baby Jesus have graced the corner of Hillsboro Boulevard and Federal Highway every December for more than 20 years.

This year, they’re joined by an 8-foot-tall aluminum Festivus Pole, symbol of a Dec. 23 atheist “holiday” that became a pop culture hit after being featured in a “Seinfeld” episode.

"It’s just 23 beer cans stacked 8 feet high and conveniently located 6 feet from Baby Jesus," said activist blogger Chaz Stevens, who installed it Thursday with the city’s permission.

Stevens said he has been trying unsuccessfully for five years to get the city to take down the Nativity scene. So this year he asked for space to express his own unreligious beliefs.

"Think of how many people have died over the years to give us our freedoms," Stevens said. "So I’ve got to push back a little."

City Attorney Andrew Maroudis declined to comment.

But Marc Rohr, a law professor at Nova Southeastern University called the display an unusual move. “I think the atheists of the world are more interested in preventing religious displays than in joining them.”

No shit, Professor Rohr.

discoverynews:

unhistorical:

November 5, 1605: The Gunpowder Plot fails.

On November 5, 1605, a man named Guy Fawkes was arrested after he was found beneath the House of Lords near dozens of barrels of gunpowder, ready to be lit. Fawkes was one of a small group of conspirators plotting to assassinate James I, England’s first Stuart king, whose attitude toward Catholics had turned from moderate to hostile as time passed. In 1604, the king reintroduced fines against non-Anglicans (and his hostility was exacerbated by the discovery of this conspiracy, of course).

Although Fawkes was the would-be assassin who was immortalized and remembered by history, the leader of the group and principal organizer was one Robert Catesby, a charismatic and zealous “crusader” who, after the plot was foiled, was found dead holding a picture of the Virgin Mary. 

The “Gunpowder Plot” had come extremely close to succeeding and had failed almost by chance. On October 26, an anonymous letter was sent informing the lords of a possible attack on Parliament, but the conspirators, aware of the letter, thought little of it. Their plan seemed to have been going smoothly until the King ordered a last-minute search of the cellars beneath Parliament, where Guy Fawkes was discovered and arrested. When interrogated and asked what he intended to do with the gunpowder that he had been found guarding, Fawkes replied that his intention had been to “to blow you Scotch beggars back to your native mountains.” He, along with his co-conspirators, was hanged, drawn, and quartered in January of 1606, and, that same year, Parliament passed an act establishing what would later be known as “Guy Fawkes Night”. The holiday was meant to commemorate the failure of the Gunpowder Plot, and (in its early years) it was as much a condemnation of Catholicism as it was a celebration of the King’s survival. A rhyme often accompanied these festivities; one went this way:

Guy Fawkes, Guy  
Stick him up on high,  
Hang him on a lamp post  
And there let him die.  
Guy,Guy,Guy,  
Poke Him in the eye,  
Put him on the fire  
And there let him die  
Burn his body from his head  
Then you’ll say  
Guy Fawkes is dead  
Hip, Hip, Hooray!  

The most famous begins with these lines:

Remember, remember the Fifth of November,
The Gunpowder Treason and Plot,
I know of no reason
Why the Gunpowder Treason
Should ever be forgot.

do you see the meaning behind the celebration of a failed terrorist plot?

shortformblog:

breakingnews:

Mourners gather to remember victims killed at Wisconsin Sikh temple
JSOnline: About 3,000 people filled the Oak Creek High School gymnasium in Wisconsin today to attend the funeral and memorial service for the six victims of Sunday’s Sikh temple shootings.
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder was among those who spoke. “In the recent past, too many Sikhs have been targeted and victimized simply because of who they are, how they look, and what they believe,” he said. “This is wrong. It is unacceptable. And it will not be tolerated.”
Photo: Friends and family members bring caskets into Oak Creek High School. (Chris Wilson / Journal Sentinel)

Big ups for Eric Holder’s strong words.

shortformblog:

breakingnews:

Mourners gather to remember victims killed at Wisconsin Sikh temple

JSOnline: About 3,000 people filled the Oak Creek High School gymnasium in Wisconsin today to attend the funeral and memorial service for the six victims of Sunday’s Sikh temple shootings.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder was among those who spoke. “In the recent past, too many Sikhs have been targeted and victimized simply because of who they are, how they look, and what they believe,” he said. “This is wrong. It is unacceptable. And it will not be tolerated.”

Photo: Friends and family members bring caskets into Oak Creek High School. (Chris Wilson / Journal Sentinel)

Big ups for Eric Holder’s strong words.

sonicbloom11:

The Atlantic:

The Geography of Hate
America’s racist groups concentrate in certain regions — and their presence correlates with religion, McCain votes, and poverty
Since 2000, the number of organized hate groups — from white nationalists, neo-Nazis and racist skinheads to border vigilantes and black separatist organizations — has climbed by more than 50 percent, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). Their rise has been fueled by growing anxiety over jobs, immigration, racial and ethnic diversity, the election of Barack Obama as America’s first black president, and the lingering economic crisis. Most of them merely espouse violent theories; some of them are stock-piling weapons and actively planning attacks.
But not all people and places hate equally; some regions of the United States — at least within some sectors of their populations — are virtual hate hatcheries. What is the geography of hate groups and organizations? Why are some regions more susceptible to them?
The SPLC maintains a detailed database on hate groups, culled from websites and publications, citizen and law enforcement reports, field sources and news reports. It defines hate groups as organizations and associations that “have beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics,” and which participate in “criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meetings, leafleting or publishing.”  As of 2010, the SPLC documents 1,002 such hate groups across the United States.
The map [above], by Zara Matheson of the Martin Prosperity Institute, graphically presents the geography of hatred in America today. Based on the number of hate groups per one million people across the U.S. states, it reveals a distinctive pattern.
Hate groups are most highly concentrated in the old South and the northern Plains states. Two states have by far the largest concentration of hate groups — Montana with 13.8 groups per million people, and Mississippi with 13.7 per million.  Arkansas (10.3), Wyoming (9.7), and Idaho (8.9) come in a distant third, fourth, and fifth.

But beyond their locations, what other factors are associated with hate groups? With the help of my colleague Charlotta Mellander, I looked at the social, political, cultural, economic and demographic factors that might be associated with the geography of hate groups. We considered a number of key factors that shape America’s geographic divide: Red state/Blue state politics; income and poverty; religion, and economic class.  It is important to note that correlation does not imply causation —we are simply looking at associations between variables. It’s also worth pointing out that Montana and Mississippi are fairly extreme outliers which may skew the results somewhat. Nonetheless, the patterns we discerned were robust and distinctive enough to warrant reporting.
First of all, the geography of hate reflects the Red state/Blue state sorting of American politics.

Hate groups were positively associated with McCain votes (with a correlation of .52).

Conversely, hate groups were negatively associated with Obama votes (with a correlation of -.54).

Hate groups also cleave along religious lines. Ironically, but perhaps not surprisingly, higher concentrations of hate groups are positively associated with states where individuals report that religion plays an important role in their everyday lives (a correlation of .35).

The geography of hate also sorts across economic lines. Hate groups are more concentrated in states with higher poverty rates (.39) and those with larger blue-collar working class workforces (.41).



Reblogging in light of Sunday’s shooting in Milwaukee.

sonicbloom11:

The Atlantic:

The Geography of Hate

America’s racist groups concentrate in certain regions — and their presence correlates with religion, McCain votes, and poverty

Since 2000, the number of organized hate groups — from white nationalists, neo-Nazis and racist skinheads to border vigilantes and black separatist organizations — has climbed by more than 50 percent, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC). Their rise has been fueled by growing anxiety over jobs, immigration, racial and ethnic diversity, the election of Barack Obama as America’s first black president, and the lingering economic crisis. Most of them merely espouse violent theories; some of them are stock-piling weapons and actively planning attacks.

But not all people and places hate equally; some regions of the United States — at least within some sectors of their populations — are virtual hate hatcheries. What is the geography of hate groups and organizations? Why are some regions more susceptible to them?

The SPLC maintains a detailed database on hate groups, culled from websites and publications, citizen and law enforcement reports, field sources and news reports. It defines hate groups as organizations and associations that “have beliefs or practices that attack or malign an entire class of people, typically for their immutable characteristics,” and which participate in “criminal acts, marches, rallies, speeches, meetings, leafleting or publishing.”  As of 2010, the SPLC documents 1,002 such hate groups across the United States.

The map [above], by Zara Matheson of the Martin Prosperity Institute, graphically presents the geography of hatred in America today. Based on the number of hate groups per one million people across the U.S. states, it reveals a distinctive pattern.

Hate groups are most highly concentrated in the old South and the northern Plains states. Two states have by far the largest concentration of hate groups — Montana with 13.8 groups per million people, and Mississippi with 13.7 per million.  Arkansas (10.3), Wyoming (9.7), and Idaho (8.9) come in a distant third, fourth, and fifth.

But beyond their locations, what other factors are associated with hate groups? With the help of my colleague Charlotta Mellander, I looked at the social, political, cultural, economic and demographic factors that might be associated with the geography of hate groups. We considered a number of key factors that shape America’s geographic divide: Red state/Blue state politics; income and poverty; religion, and economic class.  It is important to note that correlation does not imply causation —we are simply looking at associations between variables. It’s also worth pointing out that Montana and Mississippi are fairly extreme outliers which may skew the results somewhat. Nonetheless, the patterns we discerned were robust and distinctive enough to warrant reporting.

First of all, the geography of hate reflects the Red state/Blue state sorting of American politics.

Hate groups were positively associated with McCain votes (with a correlation of .52).

Conversely, hate groups were negatively associated with Obama votes (with a correlation of -.54).

Hate groups also cleave along religious lines. Ironically, but perhaps not surprisingly, higher concentrations of hate groups are positively associated with states where individuals report that religion plays an important role in their everyday lives (a correlation of .35).

The geography of hate also sorts across economic lines. Hate groups are more concentrated in states with higher poverty rates (.39) and those with larger blue-collar working class workforces (.41).

Reblogging in light of Sunday’s shooting in Milwaukee.

statedept:

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton delivers remarks at the Release of the 2011 International Religious Freedom Report at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC on July 25, 2012. [Go to http://video.state.gov for more video and text transcript].

(Source: youtu.be)

"The only news is that it’s no longer news that a Republican lawmaker spews anti-Muslim bigotry."

Ibrahim Hooper, communications director for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, responding to state Senator Kevin Grantham’s proposal to ban building mosques (via mohandasgandhi)

shortformblog:

Today in Anderson Cooper making people look stupid simply by asking questions: This lady. It may be the best entry in this subgenre of news since this video(via pbump)

latimes:

Ex-JPL employee says beliefs cost him his job: A computer specialist rankled some of his JPL co-workers by pressing intelligent design and other issues at work. Now a judge must decide if that is why he was laid off.
Photo: David Coppedge is suing JPL, the NASA center in La Cañada-Flintridge, for wrongful termination. A judge heard closing arguments this month. Credit: Nick Ut / Associated Press

latimes:

Ex-JPL employee says beliefs cost him his job: A computer specialist rankled some of his JPL co-workers by pressing intelligent design and other issues at work. Now a judge must decide if that is why he was laid off.

Photo: David Coppedge is suing JPL, the NASA center in La Cañada-Flintridge, for wrongful termination. A judge heard closing arguments this month. Credit: Nick Ut / Associated Press

I’ve started listening to John F. Kennedy’s 1960 Address to the Greater Houston Ministerial Association every now and then.

It makes me happy that a modern presidential candidate was able to clearly and concisely express separation of church and state, with video and audio documentation.

It makes me sad that he did this more than 50 years ago and people still don’t understand it.

[Full transcript here]