shortformblog:

This is pretty awesome. The Washington Post builds an interactive post on what the city would look like if they increased the building height limit up a few hundred feet or so, as the debate over the city’s growth develops. Play around with it, see how you feel. More info

Relevant to my interests.

(Source: washingtonpost.com )

earth-as-art:


Washington, DC - the Beltway and the Mall both visible from Earth orbit.

- Commander Chris Hadfield

earth-as-art:

Washington, DC - the Beltway and the Mall both visible from Earth orbit.

- Commander Chris Hadfield

americasgreatoutdoors:

The Tragedy at Pearl Harbor happened on this date in 1941. We thought we would share this picture of the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC as we remember those brave men and women who lost their lives on that terrible day.Photo: National Park Service 

americasgreatoutdoors:

The Tragedy at Pearl Harbor happened on this date in 1941. We thought we would share this picture of the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC as we remember those brave men and women who lost their lives on that terrible day.

Photo: National Park Service 

A proposal to add an amendment banning gay marriage in Minnesota’s Constitution is currently losing by a margin of 2613 votes.
Earlier tonight, Maine and Maryland became the first two states to vote in favor of recognizing gay marriage. Recognition of gay marriage is leasing by 3 percentage points in Washington state.

A proposal to add an amendment banning gay marriage in Minnesota’s Constitution is currently losing by a margin of 2613 votes.

Earlier tonight, Maine and Maryland became the first two states to vote in favor of recognizing gay marriage. Recognition of gay marriage is leasing by 3 percentage points in Washington state.

"Tonight in Maine, Maryland and Washington, the movement for marriage equality took on its opponents, on their field, under their rules and defeated them."

Ta-Nehisi Coates (via theatlantic)

Get it together Minnesota!

(via theatlantic)

latimes:

A decade after the dissolution of the Aryan Nations compound in northern Idaho and the arrest of the Montana Freemen, white supremacists, far-right militias and radical patriots have revived their dream of a homeland in the Northwest.

SPLC background on the Aryan Nations, Montana Freemen and the Sovereign Citizen Movement as a whole.

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

waveitaway:


A .gif of the Washington DC Metro (Orange Line) emerging from a tunnel. 
I played around with a few masks and sub nets and voila

my homeeeeeeeeeeeebut seriously i lived on the orange line haha

waveitaway:

A .gif of the Washington DC Metro (Orange Line) emerging from a tunnel. 

I played around with a few masks and sub nets and voila

my homeeeeeeeeeeee
but seriously i lived on the orange line haha

(Source: morningchai, via dcmetropeople)

dcmetropeople:

Came across this article yesterday and I’m not quite sure what to make of it. The graph I selected basically says if you take a photo of someone on the street and make a profit or gain, you could be arrested. So does this mean I will have to get a license to continue the site?

Under current city regulations, persons or businesses that “engage in the business of taking photographs of any person or persons upon the streets, sidewalks, or other public spaces of the District of Columbia, for profit or gain” must hold a city license and follow a number of rules governing their conduct. Breaking them happens to be an arrestable offense.

(via dcmetropeople)

Front page of today’s Washington Times. A couple things:
Clearly the unveiling of a statue at the airport of the nation’s capital named after the president who fired 11,000 air traffic controllers and banned them from ever working for the federal government again (this was rescinded by Clinton), deserves to take up half of the top fold. Because there aren’t enough things commemorating Reagan in the DC area. Or in general.
Check out the blurb for the Politics section at the bottom left of the page. If it’s hard to read, here it is:

Democratic bill would pull ‘exotic’ animals from the circus
Proponents: “Jobs” measure would put people in place of animals under the big top

 Here’s the article.

Front page of today’s Washington Times. A couple things:

Democratic bill would pull ‘exotic’ animals from the circus

Proponents: “Jobs” measure would put people in place of animals under the big top

Here’s the article.

The Onion:

Historians Politely Remind Nation To Check What’s Happened In Past Before Making Any Big Decisions
WASHINGTON—With the United States facing a daunting array of problems at home and abroad, leading historians courteously reminded the nation Thursday that when making tough choices, it never hurts to stop a moment, take a look at similar situations from the past, and then think about whether the decisions people made back then were good or bad.
According to the historians, by looking at things that have already happened, Americans can learn a lot about which actions made things better versus which actions made things worse, and can then plan their own actions accordingly.
"In the coming weeks and months, people will have to make some really important decisions about some really important issues," Columbia University historian Douglas R. Collins said during a press conference, speaking very slowly and clearly so the nation could follow his words. "And one thing we can do, before making a choice that has permanent consequences for our entire civilization, is check real quick first to see if human beings have ever done anything like it previously, and see if turned out to be a good idea or not."
"It’s actually pretty simple: We just have to ask ourselves if people doing the same thing in the past caused something bad to happen," Collins continued. "Did the thing we’re thinking of doing make people upset? Did it start a war? If it did, then we might want to think about not doing it."
In addition, Collins carefully explained that if a past decision proved to be favorable—if, for example, it led to increased employment, caused fewer deaths, or made lots of people feel good inside— then the nation should consider following through with the same decision now.
While the new strategy, known as “Look Back Before You Act,” has raised concerns among people worried they will have to remember lots of events from long ago, the historians have assured Americans they won’t be required to read all the way through thick books or memorize anything.
Instead, citizens have been told they can just find a large-print, illustrated timeline of historical events, place their finger on an important moment, and then look to the right of that point to see what happened afterward, paying especially close attention to whether things got worse or better.
"You know how the economy is not doing so well right now?" Professor Elizabeth Schuller of the University of North Carolina said. "Well, in the 1930s, financial markets—no, wait, I’m sorry. Here: A long, long time ago, way far in the past, certain things happened that were a lot like things now, and they made people hungry and sad."
"How do you feel when you’re hungry? Doesn’t feel good, does it?" Schuller added. "So, maybe we should avoid doing those things that caused people to feel that way, don’t you think?"

The Onion:

Historians Politely Remind Nation To Check What’s Happened In Past Before Making Any Big Decisions

WASHINGTON—With the United States facing a daunting array of problems at home and abroad, leading historians courteously reminded the nation Thursday that when making tough choices, it never hurts to stop a moment, take a look at similar situations from the past, and then think about whether the decisions people made back then were good or bad.

According to the historians, by looking at things that have already happened, Americans can learn a lot about which actions made things better versus which actions made things worse, and can then plan their own actions accordingly.

"In the coming weeks and months, people will have to make some really important decisions about some really important issues," Columbia University historian Douglas R. Collins said during a press conference, speaking very slowly and clearly so the nation could follow his words. "And one thing we can do, before making a choice that has permanent consequences for our entire civilization, is check real quick first to see if human beings have ever done anything like it previously, and see if turned out to be a good idea or not."

"It’s actually pretty simple: We just have to ask ourselves if people doing the same thing in the past caused something bad to happen," Collins continued. "Did the thing we’re thinking of doing make people upset? Did it start a war? If it did, then we might want to think about not doing it."

In addition, Collins carefully explained that if a past decision proved to be favorable—if, for example, it led to increased employment, caused fewer deaths, or made lots of people feel good inside— then the nation should consider following through with the same decision now.

While the new strategy, known as “Look Back Before You Act,” has raised concerns among people worried they will have to remember lots of events from long ago, the historians have assured Americans they won’t be required to read all the way through thick books or memorize anything.

Instead, citizens have been told they can just find a large-print, illustrated timeline of historical events, place their finger on an important moment, and then look to the right of that point to see what happened afterward, paying especially close attention to whether things got worse or better.

"You know how the economy is not doing so well right now?" Professor Elizabeth Schuller of the University of North Carolina said. "Well, in the 1930s, financial markets—no, wait, I’m sorry. Here: A long, long time ago, way far in the past, certain things happened that were a lot like things now, and they made people hungry and sad."

"How do you feel when you’re hungry? Doesn’t feel good, does it?" Schuller added. "So, maybe we should avoid doing those things that caused people to feel that way, don’t you think?"

shortformblog:

Hurricane Irene possibly about to ruin your weekend, East Coasters
Yeah, that’s possibly heading for DC, too: Days after the U.S. capitol felt an earthquake for probably the first time ever, they may just have to deal with a Category 2 hurricane. Hurricane Irene, which has been picking up steam for a few weeks, looks most certain to hit North Carolina as a Category 3, and will likely go up the coast, possibly hitting such hurricane-prone locales as DC, NYC and Boston along the way. Hoping it’s just a brush, kids. source
Follow ShortFormBlog

It’s going to be a fun weekend.

shortformblog:

Yeah, that’s possibly heading for DC, too: Days after the U.S. capitol felt an earthquake for probably the first time ever, they may just have to deal with a Category 2 hurricane. Hurricane Irene, which has been picking up steam for a few weeks, looks most certain to hit North Carolina as a Category 3, and will likely go up the coast, possibly hitting such hurricane-prone locales as DC, NYC and Boston along the way. Hoping it’s just a brush, kids. source

Follow ShortFormBlog

It’s going to be a fun weekend.

(Source: shortformblog)

WCP:

RFK Might Not Get the World Cup, But At Least It’ll Get a World Class Skate Park
Freshly announced from the freshly re-branded Events D.C.: Maloof Money Cup, which is a big skateboarding competition with lots of money up for grabs, will be building a 15,000-square-foot skate park on the huge parking lot at RFK Festival Grounds for its use this year and in the future. But instead of tearing it down when the whole thing is over, the park will stay, becoming the city’s biggest playground for skater dudes and ladies. And there’s more! The park’s design will be “inspired by Freedom Plaza and the buildings up and down Pennsylvania Avenue.” (I’m not sure Freedom Plaza itself is particularly inspirational, but anything’s better than a parking lot).

I don’t yet know what the financial arrangement is, but in New York City, Joe Maloof—owner of the Sacramento Kings and the Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas—funded a $1.15 million park and even kicked in money to maintain it over three years. There’s another in South Africa designed to reflect the historic Kimberley Diamond Mine.
DC’s competition is set for September 4th and 5th, so I imagine they’ll have to start construction soon; I’ll get renderings when they’re available.
UPDATE, 1:30 p.m. – I added a rendering. [Main pic above] Also, as for funding, Events D.C. will be paying for grounds preparation, while Maloof will take care of park construction.

WCP:

RFK Might Not Get the World Cup, But At Least It’ll Get a World Class Skate Park

Freshly announced from the freshly re-branded Events D.C.: Maloof Money Cup, which is a big skateboarding competition with lots of money up for grabs, will be building a 15,000-square-foot skate park on the huge parking lot at RFK Festival Grounds for its use this year and in the future. But instead of tearing it down when the whole thing is over, the park will stay, becoming the city’s biggest playground for skater dudes and ladies. And there’s more! The park’s design will be “inspired by Freedom Plaza and the buildings up and down Pennsylvania Avenue.” (I’m not sure Freedom Plaza itself is particularly inspirational, but anything’s better than a parking lot).

I don’t yet know what the financial arrangement is, but in New York City, Joe Maloof—owner of the Sacramento Kings and the Palms Casino Resort in Las Vegas—funded a $1.15 million park and even kicked in money to maintain it over three years. There’s another in South Africa designed to reflect the historic Kimberley Diamond Mine.

DC’s competition is set for September 4th and 5th, so I imagine they’ll have to start construction soon; I’ll get renderings when they’re available.

UPDATE, 1:30 p.m. – I added a rendering. [Main pic above] Also, as for funding, Events D.C. will be paying for grounds preparation, while Maloof will take care of park construction.

Washington Post:

The head of a Washington nonprofit group was arrested Tuesday for allegedly running a front organization on behalf of elements of the Pakistani government, including its spy agency, for more than two decades in an effort to influence U.S. lawmakers and other top officials.

Syed Ghulam Nabi Fai, 62, a U.S. citizen and resident of Fairfax, was charged in federal court in Virginia with participating in a long-term conspiracy to act as an agent of the Pakistani government without disclosing his affiliation.

Zaheer Ahmad, 63, a U.S. citizen and resident of Pakistan, was also charged, but remains at large. He was accused of trying to recruit “straw donors” who would provide money that was actually traced back to the Pakistani government.

Fai is the longtime director of the Kashmiri American Council, which describes itself as a nonprofit dedicated to “raising the level of knowledge in the United States about the struggle of the Kashmiri people for self-determination.” In an affidavit filed in support of a criminal complaint, however, the FBI alleged that the center is one of three so-called “Kashmir Centers” that are run by elements of the Pakistani government, including the Inter-Services Intelligence agency.

Since the mid-1990s, the affidavit said, the Kashmiri American Council has received at least $4 million from the Pakistani government.

And the downward spiral continues.

WUSA:

WASHINGTON, DC (WUSA) — An armored car robbery suspect was shot Thursday morning in Northeast during an attempted robbery.
Police are looking for other suspects say tried to rob the truck around 11 a.m. in the 200 block of Michigan Ave., Northeast.
Sources tell 9NEWS NOW the suspect was shot multiple times and has been transported to Medstar with life-threatening injuries.

WUSA:

WASHINGTON, DC (WUSA) — An armored car robbery suspect was shot Thursday morning in Northeast during an attempted robbery.

Police are looking for other suspects say tried to rob the truck around 11 a.m. in the 200 block of Michigan Ave., Northeast.

Sources tell 9NEWS NOW the suspect was shot multiple times and has been transported to Medstar with life-threatening injuries.


Supreme Court Overturns Car
WASHINGTON, DC—In a landmark reversal of a 19-year-old automobile, the Supreme Court overturned a 1978 Ford Pinto Sunday, effectively ending the car’s longstanding upright, “wheels on the ground” position.
The reversal, which has affected the lives of an estimated 400 motorists on D.C.’s Wisconsin Avenue, was overturned by the nation’s highest judicial body at approximately 9 p.m., in what legal experts described as a “strong show of support” for the Washington Redskins’ 38-28 victory over the NFC East rival Arizona Cardinals.
Said Justice David Souter, who wrote the majority opinion in the case and played a key role in the car’s reversal, lifting the back right tire off the ground: “Whoo! ‘Skins rule, motherfuckers!”
 
Added Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: “All the way, baby.”
Judicial experts agree that the reversal represents the most significant Supreme Court overturning of a motorized vehicle since its controversial 1994 decision to strike down a Yamaha motorcycle during a spring-break binge-drinking free-for-all at Freaknik ‘94 in Atlanta. Most observers attributed that decision to the presence of a crowd of inebriated African-American college students cheering the justices on, as well as the blaring of rap group Wreckx ‘N’ Effect’s “Rump Shaker.”
"By turning this Ford Pinto upside-down in the middle of the street, the Supreme Court has made a clear statement that, as far as the U.S. judicial system is concerned, the Redskins are without question the greatest team ever and cannot be stopped," said Georgetown University law professor Edwin Burber.
The court is set to rule Thursday on whether or not beer bongs are awesome.

Supreme Court Overturns Car

WASHINGTON, DC—In a landmark reversal of a 19-year-old automobile, the Supreme Court overturned a 1978 Ford Pinto Sunday, effectively ending the car’s longstanding upright, “wheels on the ground” position.

The reversal, which has affected the lives of an estimated 400 motorists on D.C.’s Wisconsin Avenue, was overturned by the nation’s highest judicial body at approximately 9 p.m., in what legal experts described as a “strong show of support” for the Washington Redskins’ 38-28 victory over the NFC East rival Arizona Cardinals.

Said Justice David Souter, who wrote the majority opinion in the case and played a key role in the car’s reversal, lifting the back right tire off the ground: “Whoo! ‘Skins rule, motherfuckers!”

Added Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: “All the way, baby.”

Judicial experts agree that the reversal represents the most significant Supreme Court overturning of a motorized vehicle since its controversial 1994 decision to strike down a Yamaha motorcycle during a spring-break binge-drinking free-for-all at Freaknik ‘94 in Atlanta. Most observers attributed that decision to the presence of a crowd of inebriated African-American college students cheering the justices on, as well as the blaring of rap group Wreckx ‘N’ Effect’s “Rump Shaker.”

"By turning this Ford Pinto upside-down in the middle of the street, the Supreme Court has made a clear statement that, as far as the U.S. judicial system is concerned, the Redskins are without question the greatest team ever and cannot be stopped," said Georgetown University law professor Edwin Burber.

The court is set to rule Thursday on whether or not beer bongs are awesome.