usagov:

Image description:
From the Department of Interior:

Snow + a rainbow + Yosemite National Park = this amazing photo. Photo: Leasha Hooker (www.sharetheexperience.org)


I love Yosemite so much.

usagov:

Image description:

From the Department of Interior:

Snow + a rainbow + Yosemite National Park = this amazing photo.

Photo: Leasha Hooker (www.sharetheexperience.org)

I love Yosemite so much.

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Early morning at Yosemite
Photo by Mark Roberts (Redwood City, California); Yosemite National Park, California

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Early morning at Yosemite

Photo by Mark Roberts (Redwood City, California); Yosemite National Park, California

latimes:

The crisis facing California sea lions

State officials have declared an “unusual mortality event” for California sea lions, after an unusually high number of pups barely clinging to life have recently washed ashore.

For a sense of the sheer number of pups who have reportedly been found washed up:

In Los Angeles County, nearly 400 pups have been stranded since the beginning of the year. Last year, 36 were reported during that stretch.

As of March 24, officials said, 214 sea lions were reported stranded in San Diego County, 189 in Orange County, 108 in Santa Barbara County and 42 in Ventura County.

Read more from reporter Rick Rojas here.

Photos: Allen J. Schaben, Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

latimes:

newsweek:

discoverynews:

First Gray Wolf Seen in California Since 1924

First one seen on my dashboard since, ever.

Has anyone ever thought about putting an animal like this on a t-shirt?
Photo credit: Cacophony / Wikimedia

There could be three of them. And they’re all howling into the sky. And the moon is there too.

latimes:

newsweek:

discoverynews:

First Gray Wolf Seen in California Since 1924

First one seen on my dashboard since, ever.

Has anyone ever thought about putting an animal like this on a t-shirt?

Photo credit: Cacophony / Wikimedia

There could be three of them. And they’re all howling into the sky. And the moon is there too.

"A year ago, Ohio ranked 48th in job creation. We trailed only Michigan and California in lost jobs – Michigan, the home of the auto industry that was devastated, and California, of course, filled by a bunch of wackadoodles."

Ohio Gov. John Kasich, in his 2012 State of the State address. (h/t Emily Steiger for the submission)

(via officialssay)

shortformblog:

Here’s the Prop 8 decision, in Scribd format. (Thanks Towelroad)

(Source: shortformblog)

latimes:

Gay-marriage ban unconstitutional, court rules
Photo: Opponents of Prop. 8  demonstrate outside of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday in San Francisco. Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

latimes:

Gay-marriage ban unconstitutional, court rules

Photo: Opponents of Prop. 8 demonstrate outside of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday in San Francisco. Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

nedhepburn:

We live in strange, strange times right now. Remind yourself of this 50 years from now when you’re tucking your grandkids into the SleepBot5000.

Read the full bill here. It’s depressingly amusing.

nedhepburn:

We live in strange, strange times right now. Remind yourself of this 50 years from now when you’re tucking your grandkids into the SleepBot5000.

Read the full bill here. It’s depressingly amusing.

(via motherjones)

Fast Company:

Shark Tales: California Bans Sale Of Shark Fins
Shark fin soup is a Chinese delicacy; walk into certain restaurants in San Francisco’s Chinatown, and you’re guaranteed to find it—but not for much longer. Last week, California governor Jerry Brown signed a law banning the sale of shark fins. It’s a move that is being celebrated by environmentalists, but some Chinese Americans are complaining that the law is an attack on their culture.
The process of shark finning is brutal, to say the least—fisherman catch sharks, slice off their tails and fins, and toss the sharks back into the water, where they quickly die. The practice has caused shark populations in some areas to drop by up to 90%. It’s especially prevalent in California, where 85% of U.S. shark fin consumption occurs. And when sharks die, it disrupts entire ocean ecosystems. Sharks are one of the top predators controlling fish populations, so when they’re gone, there is an out of whack relationship between fish and plankton.
"We applaud Governor Brown for signing AB 376," writes Bill Wong, a member of the Asian Pacific American Ocean Harmony Alliance and creator of a petition on Change.org that helped lead the charge for the law. “It puts California at the forefront of the global effort to save sharks led by a broad coalition of Asian Pacific Americans, conservationists, animal rights activists, commercial fishermen, business leaders and artists. The passage of this bill may just be the tipping point that will preserve the shark species and the ocean ecosystem.” We contacted Wong for further comment, but have yet to hear back.
California’s new law may be one of the last chances to save sharks, but it’s provoking ire from Chinese American restaurant and shop owners, who claim that the ban will put a big dent in their business. Dried shark fin sells for over $2,000 a pound, and it’s considered both a status symbol and a way to celebrate big occasions. One Chinese restauranteur tells theL.A. Times that his main business is dishing out shark fin soup, and that everything else is secondary. He is closing his restaurant at the end of the year.
That’s not to say that all Chinese Americans support shark finning. The Asian Pacific American Ocean Harmony Alliance was formed specifically for Asian Americans who don’t support the practice, and in fact, their support was instrumental in getting AB 376 passed.
Sometimes, ancient traditions aren’t worth keeping—like if they’re depleting the population of an entire species (73 million sharks are killed each year, largely for their fins). And eventually, perhaps Chinese restaurants will come around to the idea of faux shark fin soup.

If interested, check out Gordon Ramsay’s bit on shark finning. Warning: It can be a bit gruesome.

Fast Company:

Shark Tales: California Bans Sale Of Shark Fins

Shark fin soup is a Chinese delicacy; walk into certain restaurants in San Francisco’s Chinatown, and you’re guaranteed to find it—but not for much longer. Last week, California governor Jerry Brown signed a law banning the sale of shark fins. It’s a move that is being celebrated by environmentalists, but some Chinese Americans are complaining that the law is an attack on their culture.

The process of shark finning is brutal, to say the least—fisherman catch sharks, slice off their tails and fins, and toss the sharks back into the water, where they quickly die. The practice has caused shark populations in some areas to drop by up to 90%. It’s especially prevalent in California, where 85% of U.S. shark fin consumption occurs. And when sharks die, it disrupts entire ocean ecosystems. Sharks are one of the top predators controlling fish populations, so when they’re gone, there is an out of whack relationship between fish and plankton.

"We applaud Governor Brown for signing AB 376," writes Bill Wong, a member of the Asian Pacific American Ocean Harmony Alliance and creator of a petition on Change.org that helped lead the charge for the law. “It puts California at the forefront of the global effort to save sharks led by a broad coalition of Asian Pacific Americans, conservationists, animal rights activists, commercial fishermen, business leaders and artists. The passage of this bill may just be the tipping point that will preserve the shark species and the ocean ecosystem.” We contacted Wong for further comment, but have yet to hear back.

California’s new law may be one of the last chances to save sharks, but it’s provoking ire from Chinese American restaurant and shop owners, who claim that the ban will put a big dent in their business. Dried shark fin sells for over $2,000 a pound, and it’s considered both a status symbol and a way to celebrate big occasions. One Chinese restauranteur tells theL.A. Times that his main business is dishing out shark fin soup, and that everything else is secondary. He is closing his restaurant at the end of the year.

That’s not to say that all Chinese Americans support shark finning. The Asian Pacific American Ocean Harmony Alliance was formed specifically for Asian Americans who don’t support the practice, and in fact, their support was instrumental in getting AB 376 passed.

Sometimes, ancient traditions aren’t worth keeping—like if they’re depleting the population of an entire species (73 million sharks are killed each year, largely for their fins). And eventually, perhaps Chinese restaurants will come around to the idea of faux shark fin soup.

If interested, check out Gordon Ramsay’s bit on shark finning. Warning: It can be a bit gruesome.

shortformblog:

latimes:

How do photographers shoot a blackout? By using whatever available light there is.

Photos: Scenes from the massive blackout in Southern California Thursday evening. Credit: Los Angeles Times 

These shots are pretty freaking awesome. At least something good came out of that blackout.

(Source: Los Angeles Times, via shortformblog)

"It’s a supremely ridiculous waste of everybody’s time. If you want to live in a Republican state with very conservative right-wing laws, then there’s a place called Arizona."

— Today in #SHOTSFIRED: Gil Duran, spokesman for California Governor Jerry Brown, responds to a proposal to form a new state called “South California,” out of 13 southern counties. (via motherjones)

"Reading Dante is unquestionably more cultured and intellectually edifying than playing Mortal Kombat. But these cultural and intellectual differences are not constitutional ones. Crudely violent video games, tawdry TV shows, and cheap novels and magazines are no less forms of speech than The Divine Comedy, and restrictions upon them must survive strict scrutiny … ."

— Justice Antonin Scalia, emphasis his, writing the opinion of the court in Brown v. Entertainment Merchants Assn., which, in a 7-2 decision, struck down a California law prohibiting the sale of violent video games to minors.

"According to our projections, large areas of the globe are likely to warm up so quickly that, by the middle of this century, even the coolest summers will be hotter than the hottest summers of the past 50 years."

— Noah Diffenbaugh, Earth system science researcher at Stanford University and lead research of a Stanford study that finds furnace-hot temperatures soon may become the summer norm for North America. Read full story. (via californiawatch)

motherjones:

Sincerely, Kevin Drum.

Come on Mother Jones, you can’t post this article and not include the accompanying picture:

In case you’re interested, the BBC Arnold story and the other one.