ifuckinglovespace:

ageofreason:

“When my husband died, because he was so famous & known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me — it still sometimes happens — & ask me if Carl changed at the end & converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again. Carl faced his death with unflagging courage & never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don’t ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief & precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive & we were together was miraculous — not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance… That pure chance could be so generous & so kind… That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space & the immensity of time… That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me & it’s much more meaningful… 
The way he treated me & the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other & our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don’t think I’ll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.“
- Ann Druyan, talking about her husband, Carl Sagan

Happy birthday, Carl. We miss you.

ifuckinglovespace:

ageofreason:

“When my husband died, because he was so famous & known for not being a believer, many people would come up to me — it still sometimes happens — & ask me if Carl changed at the end & converted to a belief in an afterlife. They also frequently ask me if I think I will see him again. Carl faced his death with unflagging courage & never sought refuge in illusions. The tragedy was that we knew we would never see each other again. I don’t ever expect to be reunited with Carl. But, the great thing is that when we were together, for nearly twenty years, we lived with a vivid appreciation of how brief & precious life is. We never trivialized the meaning of death by pretending it was anything other than a final parting. Every single moment that we were alive & we were together was miraculous — not miraculous in the sense of inexplicable or supernatural. We knew we were beneficiaries of chance… That pure chance could be so generous & so kind… That we could find each other, as Carl wrote so beautifully in Cosmos, you know, in the vastness of space & the immensity of time… That we could be together for twenty years. That is something which sustains me & it’s much more meaningful… 

The way he treated me & the way I treated him, the way we took care of each other & our family, while he lived. That is so much more important than the idea I will see him someday. I don’t think I’ll ever see Carl again. But I saw him. We saw each other. We found each other in the cosmos, and that was wonderful.“

- Ann Druyan, talking about her husband, Carl Sagan

Happy birthday, Carl. We miss you.

(Source: ageofpuppy)

"

For decades, we have held in contempt those who actively celebrate death.

But in the years since 9/11, we have begun vaguely mimicking those we say we despise, sometimes celebrating bloodshed against those we see as Bad Guys just as vigorously as our enemies celebrate bloodshed against innocent Americans they (wrongly) deem as Bad Guys. Indeed, an America that once carefully refrained from flaunting gruesome pictures of our victims for fear of engaging in ugly death euphoria now ogles pictures of Uday and Qusay’s corpses, rejoices over images of Saddam Hussein’s hanging and throws a party at news that bin Laden was shot in the head.

"

This is bin Laden’s lamentable victory: He has changed America’s psyche from one that saw violence as a regrettable-if-sometimes-necessary act into one that finds orgasmic euphoria in news of bloodshed. In other words, he’s helped drag us down into his sick nihilism by making us like too many other bellicose societies in history — the ones that aggressively cheer on killing, as long as it is the Bad Guy that is being killed.

Read more from David Sirota on why Bin Laden’s death is a great relief, but by cheering it we’re mimicking our worst enemies.

(via fastcompany)

I wouldn’t necessarily credit just bin Laden with this, but the point stands: Over time, we have become a country that celebrates death.

(via fastcompany)

Tags: death life

the20washington:

Have We Let the Monsters Win? Osama bin Laden is no longer a threat to the world, and to say that is a relief to many is quite the understatement. This is probably among the few times it’s actually socially acceptable to celebrate someone’s gruesome death like the 4th of July, no? Well, not quite, according to Salon’s David Sirota. He argues that by celebrating bin Laden’s death, we’re actually mimicking the “foreigners cheering terrorist attacks against America.” The same group of people we usually hold in contempt and despise for their pervasive disregard for human life.
- CT
[Lydia DePillis, Salon]

the20washington:

Have We Let the Monsters Win? Osama bin Laden is no longer a threat to the world, and to say that is a relief to many is quite the understatement. This is probably among the few times it’s actually socially acceptable to celebrate someone’s gruesome death like the 4th of July, no? Well, not quite, according to Salon’s David Sirota. He argues that by celebrating bin Laden’s death, we’re actually mimicking the “foreigners cheering terrorist attacks against America.” The same group of people we usually hold in contempt and despise for their pervasive disregard for human life.

- CT

[Lydia DePillis, Salon]

(Source: the20washington)