"Only if he goes."

— Jim Graves, Democratic candidate for Minnesota’s 6th Congressional District against Michele Bachmann, offers his condition for his support for Newt Gingrich’s proposed lunar base in a reddit AMA.

(Source: shortformblog)

"If she can produce a case in one week starting today verified by three medical experts that she and i pick of a woman who became ‘retarded’ (her words) due to HPV vaccine i will donate that to a charity of her choice. She must donate 10k to a charity I pick if she fails to do so."

University of Pennsylvania bioethicist Art Caplan • E-mailing reporters with an offer of a challenge for Michele Bachmann, in response to her claims that the HPV vaccine can cause mental health issues. Here’s what we think is going to happen here — Bachmann is going to ignore Caplan because, if she doesn’t, she’s going to be proven wrong. That’s pretty much her only option for not looking stupid here. source (viafollow)

She’s going to look stupid no matter what she does or doesn’t do.

(Source: shortformblog)

Minnesota professor offers $1,000 for Bachmann’s HPV vaccine victim

StarTribune:

A University of Minnesota bioethicist is offering $1,000 for medical proof that a woman’s daughter suffered mental retardation from the vaccine for human papillomavirus virus, a story that was told by Rep. Michele Bachmann after Monday’s debate.

Bachmann has come under fire from the medical community for suggesting the vaccination for the HPV virus, a sexually transmitted disease that can cause cervical cancer, is linked to mental illness.

Steven Miles, a U of M bioethics professor, said that he’ll give $1,000 if the medical records of the woman from Bachmann’s story are released and can be viewed by a medical professional.

His offer was upped by his former boss from the University of Minnesota, Art Caplan, who is now director of the University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioethics. Caplan said he would match Miles’ challenge and offered $10,000 for proof of the HPV vaccine victim.

“These types of messages in this climate have the capacity to do enormous public health harm,” Miles said of why he made the offer. “The woman, assuming she exists, put this claim into the public domain and it’s an extremely serious claim and it deserves to be analyzed.”

After attacking Texas Gov. Rick Perry over his vaccination executive order at Monday’s debate — which scored Bachmann points from debate pundits — the Minnesota Republican said a woman had told her that the HPV vaccine had caused her daughter’s mental retardation. Bachmann repeated the story on NBC’s “Today” the next morning.

“There’s a woman that came up crying to me tonight after the debate,” Bachman told Fox News. “She said her daughter was given that vaccine. She said her daughter suffered mental retardation as a result of that vaccine.”

The comment has sparked widespread criticism from the medical community, which has said Bachmann was stoking unfounded fears similar to claims made about vaccines and Autism. The Centers for Disease Control website makes no mention of mental illness in its “adverse events” report on the HPV vaccine.

Bachmann somewhat walked back her comments Tuesday on Sean Hannity’s radio show, where she said she had “no idea” if the HPV vaccine was linked to mental illness. “I’m not a doctor, I’m not a scientist, I’m not a physician,” Bachmann said. “All I was doing is reporting what this woman told me last night at the debate.”

Miles and Caplan said they aren’t expecting much from their offer, but they are prepared to pay should the Bachmann campaign provide the woman or if she comes forward independently.

think-progress:

Do you get the feeling her eyes are following you?

MAKE IT STOP.

think-progress:

Do you get the feeling her eyes are following you?

MAKE IT STOP.

"

“The American Academy of Pediatrics would like to correct false statements made in the Republican presidential campaign that HPV vaccine is dangerous and can cause mental retardation. There is absolutely no scientific validity to this statement. Since the vaccine has been introduced, more than 35 million doses have been administered, and it has an excellent safety record.

“The American Academy of Pediatrics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Academy of Family Physicians all recommend that girls receive HPV vaccine around age 11 or 12. That’s because this is the age at which the vaccine produces the best immune response in the body, and because it’s important to protect girls well before the onset of sexual activity. In the U.S., about 6 million people, including teens, become infected with HPV each year, and 4,000 women die from cervical cancer. This is a life-saving vaccine that can protect girls from cervical cancer.”

"

American Academy of Pediatrics Statement on HPV Vaccine

shortformblog:

Michele Bachmann is attempting to tie Rick Perry’s mandating of HPV injections to President Obama’s policy on birth control. She’s also saying that the drug company that benefited from Perry’s executive order donated to Rick Perry’s campaign. 

She also said women and girls should have a choice. On HPV, not abortion.

shortformblog:

Michele Bachmann is attempting to tie Rick Perry’s mandating of HPV injections to President Obama’s policy on birth control. She’s also saying that the drug company that benefited from Perry’s executive order donated to Rick Perry’s campaign. 

She also said women and girls should have a choice. On HPV, not abortion.

(Source: shortformblog)


White-Hot GOP Race Down To Two Mentally Ill People, Person Who Lost Nomination Last Time
motherjones:

The latest poll out of Iowa is good news for Rick Perry, bad news for Michele Bachmann, and just really depressing for fans of fact-based reality.
"They were against the involvement [in Libya] before they were for it."

Talking Points Memo commenter on the site’s article “Barack Who? GOP 2012 Candidates Respond To Qaddafi’s Fall By Writing Obama Out Of History.” In fact, only Rick Santorum mentioned President Obama in his statements on the Libyan rebels’ capture of the Mediterranean nation’s capital, Tripoli.

A quick rundown, courtesy of TPM and others, on where each Republican presidential candidate stands on Libya:

Michele Bachmann: Opposed the Libya intervention from the outset and said yesterday she is “hopeful that our intervention there is about to end” and that Libya will become a partner for the international community.

Jon Huntsman: Huntsman had nice things to say about the fall of the world’s longest-reigning dictator, Muammar Qaddafi, but doesn’t mention that he was against the intervention in the first place.

Rick Perry: Called the end of the Qaddafi regime a “cause for cautious celebration” in a cautiously-worded statement that was the first from GOP contenders to hit the news yesterday.

Mitt Romney: Called on the new Libya government to extradite the mastermind behind the Lockerbie bombings, who was repatriated to Libya from an Irish* jail last summer because he was allegedly dying from illness.

Rick Santorum: Does, finally, mention Obama in saying he had “little to do with this triumph.” He has previously called the situation in Libya a “morass” and, as a fervent supporter of Israel, noted “[a]s we have seen in Egypt, the euphoria of toppling a dictator does not always result in more security for us and our allies in the region.”

Ron Paul, Newt Gingrich and Herman Cain all have yet to comment on the developments in Libya.

Want more?

  • Wonder how President Obama is reacting? “Cautiously victorious,” the New York Times writes
  • Want to donate money to the Libyan situation? The United Nations’ High Council on Refugees have established a fund to help support the more than one million people who have fled the country during the fighting.

(via dcdecoder)

*Scottish

(Source: dcdecoder)

Video above of David Gregory asking Rep. Michele Bachmann about her views on gays, marriage and appointing openly gay persons to cabinet positions from Meet the Press yesterday.

Text below from “Are Republicans at war with reality?" regarding the Thursday night GOP debate:

Michele Bachmann again proved that she is a talented debater, but her preferred tactic is simply to keep repeating baseless statements as if the rhythms of her words would provide the underlying logic. They don’t.

These go together quite well.

(Source: youtube.com)


Michele Bachmann (R)
A Payday bar sandwiched between two communion wafers. It’s nutty, ultra-Catholic, and truly one of a kind.

From Esquire’s 2012 Election Sandwiches.
One problem with this one though: Bachmann isn’t Catholic. At all. In fact, her former church has said that the Pope is the Antichrist.

Michele Bachmann (R)

A Payday bar sandwiched between two communion wafers. It’s nutty, ultra-Catholic, and truly one of a kind.

From Esquire’s 2012 Election Sandwiches.

One problem with this one though: Bachmann isn’t Catholic. At all. In fact, her former church has said that the Pope is the Antichrist.

"I’d like to be abundantly clear: My ability to function effectively will not affect my ability to serve as commander-in-chief."

Michele Bachmann addresses concerns over her migraines. (via MSNBC)

I do not think you said what you meant to say.

Some proposed Pawlenty campaign slogans, via Dave Weigel

Context: First, second and third.

pantslessprogressive:

2012 presidential hopeful Michele Bachmann releases her first ad, calling herself “the unifying choice that will beat Obama.”

Because nothing says you’re a unifier like:

(Source: youtube.com, via pantslessprogressive)