Native tribes from Canada, U.S. sign treaty to restore bison to Great Plains
BILLINGS, Mon. — Native tribes from the U.S. and Canada signed a treaty Tuesday establishing an inter-tribal alliance to restore bison to areas of the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains where millions of the animals once roamed.
Leaders of about a dozen tribes from Montana and Alberta signed the pact during a daylong ceremony on Montana’s Blackfeet Reservation, organizers said.
It marks the first treaty among the tribes and First Nations since a series of agreements governing hunting rights in the 1800s. That was when their ancestors still roamed the border region hunting bison, also called buffalo.
The long-term aim of Tuesday’s “Buffalo Treaty” is to allow the free flow of the animals across the international border and restore the bison’s central role in the food, spirituality and economies of many American Indian tribes and First Nations — a Canadian synonym for native tribes.
Such a sweeping vision could take many years to realize, particularly in the face of potential opposition from the livestock industry. But supporters said they hope to begin immediately restoring a cultural tie with bison largely severed when the species was driven to near-extinction in the late 19th century.
"The idea is, hey, if you see buffalo in your everyday life, a whole bunch of things will come back to you," said Leroy Little Bear, a member of southern Alberta Blood Tribe who helped lead the signing ceremony.
"Hunting practices, ceremonies, songs — those things revolved around the buffalo. Sacred societies used the buffalo as a totem. All of these things are going to be revised, revitalized, renewed with the presence of buffalo," said Little Bear, a professor emeritus of Native American studies at the University of Lethbridge.
Bison numbered in the tens of millions across North America before the West was settled. By the 1880s, unchecked commercial hunting to feed the bison hide market reduced the population to about 325 animals in the U.S. and fewer than 1,000 in Canada, according to wildlife officials and bison trade groups in Canada. Around the same time, tribes were relocated to reservations and forced to end their nomadic traditions.
There are about 20,000 wild bison in North America today.
Ranchers and landowners near two Montana reservations over the past several years fought unsuccessfully against the relocation of dozens of Yellowstone National Park bison due to concerns about disease and bison competing with cattle for grass. The tribes involved — the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation and the Assiniboine and Gros Ventre Tribes of the Fort Belknap Reservations — were among those signing Tuesday’s treaty.
Keith Aune, a bison expert with the Wildlife Conservation Society, said the agreement has parallels with the 1855 Lame Bull Treaty, a peace deal brokered by the U.S. government that established hunting rights tribes.
"They shared a common hunting ground, and that enabled them to live in the buffalo way," Aune said. "We’re recreating history, but this time on (the tribes’) terms."
The treaty signatories collectively control more than 6 million acres of prairie habitat in the U.S. and Canada, an area roughly the size of Vermont, according to Aune’s group.
Among the first sites eyed for bison reintroduction is along the Rocky Mountain Front, which includes Montana’s Blackfeet Reservation bordering Glacier National Park and several smaller First Nation reserves.

Native tribes from Canada, U.S. sign treaty to restore bison to Great Plains

BILLINGS, Mon. — Native tribes from the U.S. and Canada signed a treaty Tuesday establishing an inter-tribal alliance to restore bison to areas of the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains where millions of the animals once roamed.

Leaders of about a dozen tribes from Montana and Alberta signed the pact during a daylong ceremony on Montana’s Blackfeet Reservation, organizers said.

It marks the first treaty among the tribes and First Nations since a series of agreements governing hunting rights in the 1800s. That was when their ancestors still roamed the border region hunting bison, also called buffalo.

The long-term aim of Tuesday’s “Buffalo Treaty” is to allow the free flow of the animals across the international border and restore the bison’s central role in the food, spirituality and economies of many American Indian tribes and First Nations — a Canadian synonym for native tribes.

Such a sweeping vision could take many years to realize, particularly in the face of potential opposition from the livestock industry. But supporters said they hope to begin immediately restoring a cultural tie with bison largely severed when the species was driven to near-extinction in the late 19th century.

"The idea is, hey, if you see buffalo in your everyday life, a whole bunch of things will come back to you," said Leroy Little Bear, a member of southern Alberta Blood Tribe who helped lead the signing ceremony.

"Hunting practices, ceremonies, songs — those things revolved around the buffalo. Sacred societies used the buffalo as a totem. All of these things are going to be revised, revitalized, renewed with the presence of buffalo," said Little Bear, a professor emeritus of Native American studies at the University of Lethbridge.

Bison numbered in the tens of millions across North America before the West was settled. By the 1880s, unchecked commercial hunting to feed the bison hide market reduced the population to about 325 animals in the U.S. and fewer than 1,000 in Canada, according to wildlife officials and bison trade groups in Canada. Around the same time, tribes were relocated to reservations and forced to end their nomadic traditions.

There are about 20,000 wild bison in North America today.

Ranchers and landowners near two Montana reservations over the past several years fought unsuccessfully against the relocation of dozens of Yellowstone National Park bison due to concerns about disease and bison competing with cattle for grass. The tribes involved — the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation and the Assiniboine and Gros Ventre Tribes of the Fort Belknap Reservations — were among those signing Tuesday’s treaty.

Keith Aune, a bison expert with the Wildlife Conservation Society, said the agreement has parallels with the 1855 Lame Bull Treaty, a peace deal brokered by the U.S. government that established hunting rights tribes.

"They shared a common hunting ground, and that enabled them to live in the buffalo way," Aune said. "We’re recreating history, but this time on (the tribes’) terms."

The treaty signatories collectively control more than 6 million acres of prairie habitat in the U.S. and Canada, an area roughly the size of Vermont, according to Aune’s group.

Among the first sites eyed for bison reintroduction is along the Rocky Mountain Front, which includes Montana’s Blackfeet Reservation bordering Glacier National Park and several smaller First Nation reserves.

Rubin ‘Hurricane’ Carter, U.S. boxer famous in folk song, dies at 76

image

(Reuters) - Former U.S. professional boxer Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, who spent 19 years in prison for murder and then was released after it was determined he did not get a fair trial, died on Sunday at the age of 76, according to his friend and caretaker John Artis.

Carter, considered a folk hero by many and immortalized in film and song, had been battling prostate cancer for nearly three years, Artis said. He died at home in Toronto, where he had been living since he was released from prison in 1985.

"Those who are wrongfully incarcerated lost a champion," Artis said. "He dedicated his life to helping the people that need the same kind of assistance that we needed, who have been wrongfully convicted and incarcerated."

Read More

shortformblog:

mediaite:

Why don’t more major news publications engage trolls on Twitter?

It’s amazing how simple the benefit an organization can get from having a clever and accessible person manning their Twitter account.

shortformblog:

mediaite:

Why don’t more major news publications engage trolls on Twitter?

It’s amazing how simple the benefit an organization can get from having a clever and accessible person manning their Twitter account.

(Source: mediaite.com)

Tags: news media

 

shortformblog:

breakingnews:

Washington Post: The White House has filed FCC petition asking that all wireless carriers be required to unlock mobile devices so that users can easily switch between carriers.

The proposal follows up on President Obama’s response to complaints from online activists after the Library of Congress made the practice illegal in January when an exemption to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act expired.

The administration said earlier this year that consumers should be allowed to own “unlocked” phones, which spurred new bill proposals and committee discussions about the issue. The FCC also said it supported cellphone unlocking. 

Good move. This will do nothing but help consumers.

From the article:

Some argue that making it legal to unlock cellphones could make it too easy for consumers to take copyrighted software between carriers. But in Tuesday’s petition to the FCC, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration said that allowing unlocked devices would increase competition and consumer choice, while also putting the burden of changing networks on companies rather than consumers.

Hopefully carriers will stop loading phones with all their bloatware if they’re so concerned about people taking it to a different carrier.


Journalists Brief Security Council for First Time
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Four journalists addressing the U.N. Security Council Wednesday said world leaders should do more to protect reporters risking their lives in conflict situations with one foreign correspondent calling for protections similar to those afforded to international diplomats.
NBC’s chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel said that protecting journalists today is perhaps harder than ever “because you have to tackle the question of who is a journalist and who is an activist in a way that never existed before.”
"We’re all bloggers and punks and rebels with cameras. There is absolutely no respect for career journalists anymore," said Engel, who was kidnapped by pro-regime gunmen in northern Syria and held for five days in Dec. 2012.
Engel told council ambassadors that professional journalists should be recognized, “and just like you in the diplomatic community need protection to be objective, if you want professionals who are also objective, we need protection as well.”
Associated Press Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll, vice chairwoman of the Committee to Protect Journalists, said that reporters serve as the public’s eyes and ears in conflict situations by going to places and asking questions that most people cannot.
"An attack on a journalist is a proxy for an attack on the ordinary citizen, an attack on that citizen’s right to information about their communities and their institutions" and their world, she said.
The council invited journalists to brief members for the first time at the invitation of the United States, which holds the Security Council presidency this month.
U.N. Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson opened the meeting by decrying the killing of more than 600 journalists in the past decade, including 41 in Syria last year including those who were using social media.
While the council, which deals with threats to international peace and security, was focusing on threats to journalists in armed conflict, Eliasson said journalists in many non-conflict situations around the world have also been killed and are at grave risk.
According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, “most murdered journalists — 5 in 6 — are killed in their own hometowns covering local stories — crime and corruption,” Carroll said.

Journalists Brief Security Council for First Time

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Four journalists addressing the U.N. Security Council Wednesday said world leaders should do more to protect reporters risking their lives in conflict situations with one foreign correspondent calling for protections similar to those afforded to international diplomats.

NBC’s chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel said that protecting journalists today is perhaps harder than ever “because you have to tackle the question of who is a journalist and who is an activist in a way that never existed before.”

"We’re all bloggers and punks and rebels with cameras. There is absolutely no respect for career journalists anymore," said Engel, who was kidnapped by pro-regime gunmen in northern Syria and held for five days in Dec. 2012.

Engel told council ambassadors that professional journalists should be recognized, “and just like you in the diplomatic community need protection to be objective, if you want professionals who are also objective, we need protection as well.”

Associated Press Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll, vice chairwoman of the Committee to Protect Journalists, said that reporters serve as the public’s eyes and ears in conflict situations by going to places and asking questions that most people cannot.

"An attack on a journalist is a proxy for an attack on the ordinary citizen, an attack on that citizen’s right to information about their communities and their institutions" and their world, she said.

The council invited journalists to brief members for the first time at the invitation of the United States, which holds the Security Council presidency this month.

U.N. Deputy Secretary-General Jan Eliasson opened the meeting by decrying the killing of more than 600 journalists in the past decade, including 41 in Syria last year including those who were using social media.

While the council, which deals with threats to international peace and security, was focusing on threats to journalists in armed conflict, Eliasson said journalists in many non-conflict situations around the world have also been killed and are at grave risk.

According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, “most murdered journalists — 5 in 6 — are killed in their own hometowns covering local stories — crime and corruption,” Carroll said.

nationalpost:

Star astronaut Chris Hadfield to retire from Canadian Space Agency Chris Hadfield is moving back to Canada after decades away from home. The famous astronaut announced today that he is retiring from the Canadian Space Agency next month.He made the announcement at a news conference at the agency headquarters, near Montreal, in his first such event in Canada since his return from space.Hadfield says he’d promised his wife three decades ago, when they moved to the U.S. to pursue his career, that they would return home some day.He says he’s ready to pursue private interests, outside government. Hadfield says he hasn’t decided what he will do next, but says he plans to do presentations on space while reflecting over the coming year on his next move.

nationalpost:

Star astronaut Chris Hadfield to retire from Canadian Space Agency 
Chris Hadfield is moving back to Canada after decades away from home. The famous astronaut announced today that he is retiring from the Canadian Space Agency next month.

He made the announcement at a news conference at the agency headquarters, near Montreal, in his first such event in Canada since his return from space.

Hadfield says he’d promised his wife three decades ago, when they moved to the U.S. to pursue his career, that they would return home some day.

He says he’s ready to pursue private interests, outside government. Hadfield says he hasn’t decided what he will do next, but says he plans to do presentations on space while reflecting over the coming year on his next move.

"This has become not just a war within Syria. It has become a regional, sectarian civil war. Perhaps the best way to put it is to say that what was a war in Syria with regional spillover has now become a regional war with a Syrian focus."

Robert Malley of the International Crisis Group talks with Terry Gross about the expansion of the war in Syria. (via nprfreshair)’

Romenesko:

UPDATE: Chicago Tribune media reporter Robert Channick has also tweeted the news and reports the Sun-Times “plans to use freelancers going forward.”

UPDATE 2: From a Sun-Times Media Group employee: “Photog email accounts are already shut down…emails to our photo staff just got returned…this is bananas.”

Whoever wrote this headline must have been very pleased with themselves.

Tags: news headlines LA

shortformblog:

On the occasion of World Press Freedom Day, we’re revisiting this video, which we first posted several months ago — it’s NBC News’ Chief Foreign Correspondent, Richard Engel, detailing to MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow the horrifying tale of how he was abducted by pro-Assad forces within Syria, and how he came to be freed. Engel is one of the lucky ones (extremely lucky, considering the content of his story) — 23 professional journalists have been killed covering the civil war, the majority of them Syrian, on top of dozens more slain citizen journalists. 

Who would ever think this is a good idea?

"Contrary to widespread reporting, no arrest has been made in connection with the Boston Marathon attack. Over the past day and a half, there have been a number of press reports based on information from unofficial sources that has been inaccurate. Since these stories often have unintended consequences, we ask the media, particularly at this early stage of the investigation, to exercise caution and attempt to verify information through appropriate official channels before reporting."

Following reports from several news outlets stating that an arrest had been made in connection to the Boston Marathon attack, the FBI released the strongly-worded statement above denying that anyone has been brought into custody. (via latimes)

Unfortunately, I imagine we’ll still deal with quite a few more unconfirmed reports for the next few days and weeks ahead.

(via latimes)

Tags: news Boston media

"Quite frankly, people can bake cupcakes"

Forget Gold, the Gourmet Cupcake Market Is Crashing - WSJ.com (via markcoatney)

Finally.

(via markcoatney)

shortformblog:

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick was asked if Boston Marathon bombings were a “false flag” incident. (The questioner? Infowars correspondent Dan Bidondi.) His response: “No. Next question?”