chicagohistorymuseum:

The Chicago Teachers Union emerged as a result of the hardships public schoolteachers endured during the Great Depression. Above: Teachers demonstrate in downtown Chicago, c. 1935.
Want a copy of this photo?  > Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: ICHi-20855

chicagohistorymuseum:

The Chicago Teachers Union emerged as a result of the hardships public schoolteachers endured during the Great Depression. Above: Teachers demonstrate in downtown Chicago, c. 1935.

Want a copy of this photo?  
> Visit our Rights and Reproductions Department and give them this number: ICHi-20855

nationalpost:

Montreal police and protesters rage through the night as tuition march turns violent
Montreal is waking up to a morning of smashed windows, vandalized cars and questions about how a protest degenerated into yet another violent clash between police and demonstrators.

Anger over a short lived effort to put an end to the tuition crisis through negotiations bubbled over Wednesday night when a hastily-organized demonstration turned ugly and police used batons, pepper spray and percussion bombs to disperse the crowd.

After two hours of peaceful protest, police declared the march illegal and the situation unravelled quickly. A car was set on fire at a major downtown intersection and chaos ensued as the police started to push the crowd back using whatever tools they had in their arsenal. (Photos: Dario Ayala, Allen McInnis/Postmedia News)

notangryenough:

Chilean student leader Camila Vallejo sits among a peace sign created from empty teargas canisters used by police against protesters. Photograph: Roberto Candia/AP
Not since the days of Zapatistas’ Subcomandante Marcos has Latin America been so charmed by a rebel leader. This time, there is no ski mask, no pipe and no gun, just a silver nose ring.
Meet Commander Camila, a student leader in Chile who has become the face of a populist uprising that some analysts are calling the Chilean winter. Her press conferences can lead to the sacking of a minister. The street marches she leads shut down sections of the Chilean capital. She has the government on the run, and now even has police protection after receiving death threats.
Wednesday saw the start of a two-day nationwide shutdown, as transport workers and other public-sector employees joined the burgeoning student movement in protest.
“There are huge levels of discontent,” said Vallejo in a recent interview. “It is always the youth that make the first move … we don’t have family commitments, this allows us to be freer. We took the first step, but we are no longer alone, the older generations are now joining this fight.”
“We do not want to improve the actual system; we want a profound change – to stop seeing education as a consumer good, to see education as a right where the state provides a guarantee.
“Why do we need education? To make profits. To make a business? Or to develop the country and have social integration and development? Those are the issues in dispute.”
Excerpts from the article on The Guardian Website.

notangryenough:

Chilean student leader Camila Vallejo sits among a peace sign created from empty teargas canisters used by police against protesters. Photograph: Roberto Candia/AP

Not since the days of Zapatistas’ Subcomandante Marcos has Latin America been so charmed by a rebel leader. This time, there is no ski mask, no pipe and no gun, just a silver nose ring.

Meet Commander Camila, a student leader in Chile who has become the face of a populist uprising that some analysts are calling the Chilean winter. Her press conferences can lead to the sacking of a minister. The street marches she leads shut down sections of the Chilean capital. She has the government on the run, and now even has police protection after receiving death threats.

Wednesday saw the start of a two-day nationwide shutdown, as transport workers and other public-sector employees joined the burgeoning student movement in protest.

“There are huge levels of discontent,” said Vallejo in a recent interview. “It is always the youth that make the first move … we don’t have family commitments, this allows us to be freer. We took the first step, but we are no longer alone, the older generations are now joining this fight.”

“We do not want to improve the actual system; we want a profound change – to stop seeing education as a consumer good, to see education as a right where the state provides a guarantee.

“Why do we need education? To make profits. To make a business? Or to develop the country and have social integration and development? Those are the issues in dispute.”

Excerpts from the article on The Guardian Website.

(via itsok-imblack)

(Source: motherjones)

motherjones:

What’s Happening in Wisconsin, Explained
We did it for Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain, and now Wisconsin: a rundown of the what, where, when, how, and why in the Badger State, updated daily.

motherjones:

What’s Happening in Wisconsin, Explained

We did it for Tunisia, Egypt, Bahrain, and now Wisconsin: a rundown of the what, where, when, how, and why in the Badger State, updated daily.

(Source: BuzzFeed)

motherjones:

“Egypt Supports Wisconsin Workers: One World, One Pain”
Shukran jazilan, Muhammad Saladin Nusair!

motherjones:

“Egypt Supports Wisconsin Workers: One World, One Pain”

Shukran jazilan, Muhammad Saladin Nusair!

motherjones:

Wisconsin + Arcade Fire = a viral video. Here’s what it’s all about, people.

(via headphonesnotrequired)

"Everything that the experts say and everything that the activists and politicians have taken for granted for a generation, at least, is really off the table. What’s been happening, first in Lebanon and then in Tunisia and now in Egypt and who knows further afield, suggests that new forces have been unleashed and we have no idea where they might lead and what new dynamics they might create."

Veteran Middle East correspondent Thanassis Cambanis, on how no one really knows what’s going to happen in the Middle East, in a wide-ranging discussion today on Fresh Air about the future of Egypt, Hezbollah, and relations with Israel. (via nprfreshair)

Again, Cambanis knows of what he speaks. Listen to him.

(via nprfreshair)

nationaljournal:

An interactive map of the recent areas of unrest throughout Africa and the Middle East.

nationaljournal:

An interactive map of the recent areas of unrest throughout Africa and the Middle East.

(via theatlantic)

"I never wanted power or prestige, and people know the difficult circumstances in which I shouldered the responsibility and what I have given to the homeland during war and during the peace."

— Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s bullshitter in chief