reuters:

This Reuters graphic shows there have been 6,519 men, 190 women and 465 children killed in violence in Syria as of Feb. 5, 2012. The most fatalities in a single day since April of last year happened on Feb. 4, 2012 with 400 deaths reported.
The latest on Syria | Follow Reuters on Tumblr
[Graphic: REUTERS | Sources: UNITAR-UNOSAT, Syria Violence Document Center, syrianshuhada.com, syriamap.wordpress.com, news reports]

reuters:

This Reuters graphic shows there have been 6,519 men, 190 women and 465 children killed in violence in Syria as of Feb. 5, 2012. The most fatalities in a single day since April of last year happened on Feb. 4, 2012 with 400 deaths reported.

The latest on Syria | Follow Reuters on Tumblr

[Graphic: REUTERS | Sources: UNITAR-UNOSAT, Syria Violence Document Center, syrianshuhada.com, syriamap.wordpress.com, news reports]

(via theatlantic)

shortformblog:

Because Tumblr user PoetFire asked: Most media outlets are reporting “hundreds” of protesters (or “more than 1,000”) at today’s Occupy Wall Street event. However, a Twitter meme going around today puts that number at closer to 50,000. Above is said tweet, via @AnonOps. Below is a fairly representative crowd shot of the protests, via Twitter user @EgyptEagle, a screenshot from a video of the protests, and (for comparison) an aerial screenshot from a video that showed the crowds at the Tea Party Express protest in Harry Reid’s hometown of Searchlight, Nev. The Searchlight protest had a crowd of about 9,000 people. Do you see 50,000 people at today’s protests? We don’t. (BTW: If anyone has an aerial shot of today’s protests, please send it along.)

(via shortformblog)

What Will Norway Make of the Westboro Baptist Church?

The Atlantic Wire:

The ever-infuriating Westboro Baptist Church, which made its reputation picketing the funerals of soldiers while holding signs saying “god hates fags” and “thank god for dead soldiers,” says it is heading to Norway to lend its presence to the funerals of those killed in the July 22 massacre. The groupposted a press release to its web site announcing its plans to picket the funerals of those who lost their lives when Anders Breivik set off a bomb in Oslo that killed eight and then traveled to the island of Utoya to execute 69 at a youth camp. The Topeka-based church, run by former civil rights activist Fred Phelps, sees homosexuality as a deadly sin and has vocally interpreted slain soldiers as a message from god that the United States is “a sodomite nation of flag-worshiping idolaters.” The Norway venture seems to be in the same vein:

But unlike in the United States, where the Supreme Court has upheld the church’s right to picket funerals and protest synagogues, Norway has laws banning hate speech. Its penal code reads, in part:

Any person who willfully or through gross negligence publicly utters a discriminatory or hateful expression shall be liable to fines or imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years. An expression that is uttered in such a way that it is likely to reach a large number of persons shall be deemed equivalent to a publicly uttered expression, cf. section 7, No. 2. The use of symbols shall also be deemed to be an expression. Any person who aids and abets such an offense shall be liable to the same penalty.

If Westboro is going to protest, its members had better get their lawyers ready. Holding a sign outside a funeral would certainly constitute public speech. In a story about the church’s plan, the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK) got a quote from Oslo Police chief of staff John Fuller. “ If they implement what they threaten, I can only confirm that it is one of the most bad ideas at the moment,” Fuller said, adding that he “hoped they restrained themselves.” But one Norwegian posting in an English-language message board said he doubted the church would even be granted access to enter the country, and if they did make it to a funeral, “they’ll be surrounded by some tens of thousand people telling them how completely insane they are.”

I cannot wait for Norway to arrest them and just laugh in their faces when they try to sue.

bensgrabbag:

Josh, have you met him yet?
More here. (h/t John Cole) 

bensgrabbag:

Josh, have you met him yet?

More here. (h/t John Cole

NYTimes:

 Security Forces in Bahrain Fire on Mourners and Journalists
MANAMA, Bahrain — Government forces opened fire on hundreds of mourners marching toward Pearl Square Friday, sending people running away in panic amid the boom of concussion grenades. But even as the people fled, at least one helicopter sprayed fire on them and a witness reported seeing mourners crumpling to the ground.
It was not immediately clear what type of ammunition the forces were firing, but some witnesses reported live fire from automatic weapons and the crowd was screaming “live fire, live fire.” At a nearby hospital, witnesses reported seeing people with very serious injuries and gaping wounds, at least some of them caused by rubber bullets that appeared to have been fired at close range.
Even as ambulances rushed to rescue people, forces fired on medics loading the wounded into their vehicles.
A Western official said at least one person had died in the mayhem surrounding the square, and reports said at least 50 were wounded. The official quoted a witness as saying that the shooters were from the military, not the police, indicating a hardening of the government’s stance against those trying to stage a popular revolt.
The mourners who were trying to march on symbolic Pearl Square were mostly young men who had been part of a funeral procession for a protester killed in an earlier crackdown by police.
Minutes after the first shots were fired, forces in a helicopter that had been shooting at the crowds, opened fire at a Western reporter and videographer who were filming a sequence on the latest violence.
At least seven people had died in clampdowns before Friday’s violence.
[Read More]

Aside from obvious concerns about Bahrain firing on its own people, Americans should pay closer attention to this for one simple reason: The Fifth Fleet is based just outside Manama.
What happens in Bahrain, regardless of the protest’s outcome, will dramatically change the United States’ outlook on the region, if it hasn’t already.

NYTimes:

 Security Forces in Bahrain Fire on Mourners and Journalists

MANAMA, Bahrain — Government forces opened fire on hundreds of mourners marching toward Pearl Square Friday, sending people running away in panic amid the boom of concussion grenades. But even as the people fled, at least one helicopter sprayed fire on them and a witness reported seeing mourners crumpling to the ground.

It was not immediately clear what type of ammunition the forces were firing, but some witnesses reported live fire from automatic weapons and the crowd was screaming “live fire, live fire.” At a nearby hospital, witnesses reported seeing people with very serious injuries and gaping wounds, at least some of them caused by rubber bullets that appeared to have been fired at close range.

Even as ambulances rushed to rescue people, forces fired on medics loading the wounded into their vehicles.

A Western official said at least one person had died in the mayhem surrounding the square, and reports said at least 50 were wounded. The official quoted a witness as saying that the shooters were from the military, not the police, indicating a hardening of the government’s stance against those trying to stage a popular revolt.

The mourners who were trying to march on symbolic Pearl Square were mostly young men who had been part of a funeral procession for a protester killed in an earlier crackdown by police.

Minutes after the first shots were fired, forces in a helicopter that had been shooting at the crowds, opened fire at a Western reporter and videographer who were filming a sequence on the latest violence.

At least seven people had died in clampdowns before Friday’s violence.

[Read More]

Aside from obvious concerns about Bahrain firing on its own people, Americans should pay closer attention to this for one simple reason: The Fifth Fleet is based just outside Manama.

What happens in Bahrain, regardless of the protest’s outcome, will dramatically change the United States’ outlook on the region, if it hasn’t already.