"

James Van Allen once told me that the pursuit of knowledge was a sufficient answer for questions about applicability of space exploration. It’s all about understanding who we are, where we come from, and where we’re going. We’re all the stuff of stars, and now we’re actually examining that ‘stuff’.

"

— Bill Kurth, Voyager plasma wave co-investigator, during reddit IAMA after NASA announced that the Voyager spacecraft has left the solar system. (via ifuckinglovespace)

(via ifuckinglovespace)


Bogda Mountains, China
The Turpan Depression, nestled at the foot of China’s Bogda Mountains, is a strange mix of salt lakes and sand dunes. It is one of the few landscapes in the world that lies below sea level.
This image was acquired by Landsat 7’s Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor.
Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch as part of the Earth as Art II image series

Bogda Mountains, China

The Turpan Depression, nestled at the foot of China’s Bogda Mountains, is a strange mix of salt lakes and sand dunes. It is one of the few landscapes in the world that lies below sea level.

This image was acquired by Landsat 7’s Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+) sensor.

Image provided by the USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch as part of the Earth as Art II image series

(via earth-as-art)

nationalpost:

Star astronaut Chris Hadfield to retire from Canadian Space Agency Chris Hadfield is moving back to Canada after decades away from home. The famous astronaut announced today that he is retiring from the Canadian Space Agency next month.He made the announcement at a news conference at the agency headquarters, near Montreal, in his first such event in Canada since his return from space.Hadfield says he’d promised his wife three decades ago, when they moved to the U.S. to pursue his career, that they would return home some day.He says he’s ready to pursue private interests, outside government. Hadfield says he hasn’t decided what he will do next, but says he plans to do presentations on space while reflecting over the coming year on his next move.

nationalpost:

Star astronaut Chris Hadfield to retire from Canadian Space Agency 
Chris Hadfield is moving back to Canada after decades away from home. The famous astronaut announced today that he is retiring from the Canadian Space Agency next month.

He made the announcement at a news conference at the agency headquarters, near Montreal, in his first such event in Canada since his return from space.

Hadfield says he’d promised his wife three decades ago, when they moved to the U.S. to pursue his career, that they would return home some day.

He says he’s ready to pursue private interests, outside government. Hadfield says he hasn’t decided what he will do next, but says he plans to do presentations on space while reflecting over the coming year on his next move.


Curiosity Self-Portrait Panorama Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, MSSS - Panorama by Andrew Bodrov
Explanation: This remarkable self-portrait of NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover includes a sweeping panoramic view of its current location in the Yellowknife Bay region of the Red Planet’s Gale Crater. The rover’s flat, rocky perch, known as “John Klein”, served as the site for Curiosity’s first rock drilling activity. At the foot of the proud looking rover, a shallow drill test hole and a sample collection hole are 1.6 centimeters in diameter. The impressive mosaic was constructed using frames from the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) and Mastcam. Used to take in the panoramic landscape frames, the Mastcam is standing high above the rover’s deck. But MAHLI, intended for close-up work, is mounted at the end of the rover’s robotic arm. The MAHLI frames used to create Curiosity’s self-portrait exclude sections that show the arm itself and so MAHLI and the robotic arm are not seen. Check out this spectacular interactive version of Curiosity’s self-portrait panorama.

Curiosity Self-Portrait Panorama 
Image Credit: NASAJPL-CaltechMSSS - Panorama by Andrew Bodrov

Explanation: This remarkable self-portrait of NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover includes a sweeping panoramic view of its current location in the Yellowknife Bay region of the Red Planet’s Gale Crater. The rover’s flat, rocky perch, known as “John Klein”, served as the site for Curiosity’s first rock drilling activity. At the foot of the proud looking rover, a shallow drill test hole and a sample collection hole are 1.6 centimeters in diameter. The impressive mosaic was constructed using frames from the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) and Mastcam. Used to take in the panoramic landscape frames, the Mastcam is standing high above the rover’s deck. But MAHLI, intended for close-up work, is mounted at the end of the rover’s robotic arm. The MAHLI frames used to create Curiosity’s self-portrait exclude sections that show the arm itself and so MAHLI and the robotic arm are not seen. Check out this spectacular interactive version of Curiosity’s self-portrait panorama.

(via ifuckinglovespace)

latimes:

Tragedy in Russia: Hundreds have been reported injured after a meteorite crashed near the city of Chelyabinsk in Russia’s Ural Mountains Friday. Said Nadezhda Golovko, deputy head of Chelyabinsk Secondary School No. 130:

When I saw some white narrow cloud moving outside the window I ran up to it and saw a huge blinding flash. It was like the way I would imagine a nuclear bomb. At first, there was no sound at all as if I suddenly went deaf

Russian authorities have rushed to the scene in mass, assessing damage and making sure there’s no increase in radiation levels as a result of the impact.

Read more about the impact over at World Now.

(Photos via Nasha Gazeta / www.ng.kz / Associated Press, Oleg Kargopolov / AFP/Getty Images, Chelyabinsk.ru / Associated Press)

ifuckinglovespace:

Landsat 8 has lift-off.

“Everything is looking good.”

ifuckinglovespace:

Landsat 8 on the launch pad.
Watch it live.

ifuckinglovespace:

Landsat 8 on the launch pad.

Watch it live.


First View of Earth from Moon Date: 23 Aug 1966
NASA’s Lunar Orbiter 1 sent back the world’s first view of Earth from the vicinity of the Moon. The photo was later reprised in color by the Apollo astronauts.
Credit: NASA

This is a new project I’ve started.
Earth as Art will feature a new image of the Earth from space every day. The title is shared with a series of photos taken by Landsats 5 and 7 and distributed by the USGS.
This blog, however, will use photos from every available source, whether from satellites, probes, rockets or astronauts, to showcase our planet’s beauty from that unique perspective.

First View of Earth from Moon 
Date: 23 Aug 1966

NASA’s Lunar Orbiter 1 sent back the world’s first view of Earth from the vicinity of the Moon. The photo was later reprised in color by the Apollo astronauts.

Credit: NASA

This is a new project I’ve started.

Earth as Art will feature a new image of the Earth from space every day. The title is shared with a series of photos taken by Landsats 5 and 7 and distributed by the USGS.

This blog, however, will use photos from every available source, whether from satellites, probes, rockets or astronauts, to showcase our planet’s beauty from that unique perspective.

(via earth-as-art)

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module Installation Animation

An animation of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module’s extraction and installation on the International Space Station.

NASA and Bigelow Aerospace announced today plans to deploy expandable modules to the ISS. Here are NASA’s release and the Orlando Sentinel’s story on the news.

The BEAM is scheduled to be launched in 2015 aboard SpaceX’s Dragon.

(via ifuckinglovespace)

"It’s a big deal — It’s definitely a good candidate for life. … Maybe there’s no land life, but perhaps very clever dolphins."

Astrophysicist Mario Lavio on the recently announced “super-Earth” exoplanet KOI-172.02.

ifuckinglovespace:

Title: Astronaut Ronald Evans photographed during transearth coast EVA
Description: Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 17 spacecraft’s transearth coast. During his EVA Command Module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The total time for the transearth EVA was one hour seven minutes 19 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) and ending at ground elapsed time of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, December 17, 1972.

ifuckinglovespace:

Title:
Astronaut Ronald Evans photographed during transearth coast EVA

Description:
Astronaut Ronald E. Evans is photographed performing extravehicular activity (EVA) during the Apollo 17 spacecraft’s transearth coast. During his EVA Command Module pilot Evans retrieved film cassettes from the Lunar Sounder, Mapping Camera, and Panoramic Camera. The total time for the transearth EVA was one hour seven minutes 19 seconds, starting at ground elapsed time of 257:25 (2:28 p.m.) and ending at ground elapsed time of 258:42 (3:35 p.m.) on Sunday, December 17, 1972.



The Last Moon Shot Credit: Apollo Program, NASA (image scanned by J.L. Pickering)
Explanation: In 1865 Jules Verne predicted the invention of a space capsule that could carry people. His science fiction story “From the Earth to the Moon” outlined his vision of a cannon in Florida so powerful that it could shoot a Projectile-Vehicle carrying three adventurers to the Moon. Over 100 years later NASA, guided by Wernher Von Braun’s vision, produced the Saturn V rocket. From a spaceport in Florida, this rocket turned Verne’s fiction into fact, launching 9 Apollo Lunar missions and allowing 12 astronauts to walk on the Moon. As spotlights play on the rocket and launch pad at dusk, the last moon shot, Apollo 17, is pictured here awaiting its December 1972 night launch.

The Last Moon Shot 
Credit: Apollo ProgramNASA (image scanned by J.L. Pickering)

Explanation: In 1865 Jules Verne predicted the invention of a space capsule that could carry people. His science fiction story “From the Earth to the Moon” outlined his vision of a cannon in Florida so powerful that it could shoot a Projectile-Vehicle carrying three adventurers to the Moon. Over 100 years later NASA, guided by Wernher Von Braun’s vision, produced the Saturn V rocket. From a spaceport in Florida, this rocket turned Verne’s fiction into fact, launching 9 Apollo Lunar missions and allowing 12 astronauts to walk on the Moon. As spotlights play on the rocket and launch pad at dusk, the last moon shot, Apollo 17, is pictured here awaiting its December 1972 night launch.

(via ifuckinglovespace)

"Okay, Houston. Standing here in Hadley, in the midst of miracles unknown, I am aware that there is a fundamental truth of our nature. Man must explore, and it is - research in the greatest sense."

— Commander David Scott, Apollo 15 (via ifuckinglovespace)

(Source: hq.nasa.gov, via ifuckinglovespace)

"“You develop an instant global consciousness, a people orientation, an intense dissatisfaction with the state of the world, and a compulsion to do something about it. From out there on the moon, international politics look so petty. You want to grab a politician by the scruff of the neck and drag him a quarter of a million miles out and say, “Look at that, you son of a bitch.”"

— Edgar Mitchell, Apollo 14 astronaut (via ifuckinglovespace)