npr:

A ‘Whom Do You Hang With?’ Map Of America
Look at the center of this map, at the little red dot that marks Kansas City. Technically, Kansas City is at the edge of Missouri, but here on this map it’s in the upper middle section of a bigger space with strong blue borders. We don’t have a name for this bigger space yet, but soon we will.
How It Works
Here’s the notion. A few years ago, Dirk Brockmann, a theoretical physicist from Germany, was visiting his American friend Dennis, and they got talking about population mobility. Dirk knew Americans move around a lot, but he wondered how to capture where they go, who they talk to. His friend said, “Have you ever heard of Where’s George?Dirk hadn’t.
It’s a website that tracks the movement of dollar bills. Thousands of people participate. All you do is take a bill out of your wallet, type the denomination, serial number, the date and your zip code onto the Where’s George? site, and then, with a pen or a stamp, deface the bill with the words “WheresGeorge.com.” After which (and this is key), you spend it. So now your bill is moving from business to business, person to person, and if and when another Where’s George volunteer discovers it, she or he will note where, note when and spend it again. Since dollar bills pass between people, Dennis suggested why not us the “Where’s George?” data to get a sense of where people go, and, just as interesting, where they don’t go?
That’s what Dirk did. After checking 1,033,095 reports (describing the movement of 464,670 bills), he came up with this map.

npr:

A ‘Whom Do You Hang With?’ Map Of America

Look at the center of this map, at the little red dot that marks Kansas City. Technically, Kansas City is at the edge of Missouri, but here on this map it’s in the upper middle section of a bigger space with strong blue borders. We don’t have a name for this bigger space yet, but soon we will.

How It Works

Here’s the notion. A few years ago, Dirk Brockmann, a theoretical physicist from Germany, was visiting his American friend Dennis, and they got talking about population mobility. Dirk knew Americans move around a lot, but he wondered how to capture where they go, who they talk to. His friend said, “Have you ever heard of Where’s George?Dirk hadn’t.

It’s a website that tracks the movement of dollar bills. Thousands of people participate. All you do is take a bill out of your wallet, type the denomination, serial number, the date and your zip code onto the Where’s George? site, and then, with a pen or a stamp, deface the bill with the words “WheresGeorge.com.” After which (and this is key), you spend it. So now your bill is moving from business to business, person to person, and if and when another Where’s George volunteer discovers it, she or he will note where, note when and spend it again. Since dollar bills pass between people, Dennis suggested why not us the “Where’s George?” data to get a sense of where people go, and, just as interesting, where they don’t go?

That’s what Dirk did. After checking 1,033,095 reports (describing the movement of 464,670 bills), he came up with this map.

mohandasgandhi:

uhuh-she-said:

mohandasgandhi:

jasencomstock:

theonion:

Daniel Tosh Chuckles Through Own Violent Rape:
‘You Just Gotta Laugh,’ Reports Comedian Through Blood And Tears
More.

Aaaaaaand the Onion just told a rape joke.

The point about not telling raping jokes because they enable and preserve rape culture is to never tell them at all, not counter rape jokes by telling more rape jokes. Why is this a difficult concept?

To be honest, I think it’s possible to tell a rape joke that is both insightful, thoughtful and tragic. Comedy and satire is not always about a guffaw and I do believe that one of it’s great advantages, is that it can get people to go to a very scary place with little resistance. To consider aspects of life they wouldn’t otherwise. Rape jokes can and often do veer into incredibly distasteful territory, but what I’m saying is: they don’t have to. 
Which is not to say that I think anybody needs to tolerate a rape joke. But I think calling something wrong across the board 100% of the time, does a disservice to what satire/comedy can actually accomplish.
That article is actually really disturbing and terrifying and as such shows just how awful Daniel Tosh really is. How disgusting what he was advocating was.  In this case, I honestly think this piece satire does not preserve rape culture, but actually is actively battling against it. 

I could not disagree more and there’s a very good reason why: rapists think all men rape and joking about it only cements this belief:

6% of college age men, slightly over 1 in 20, will admit to raping someone in anonymous surveys, as long as the word “rape” isn’t used in the description of the act.
6% of Penny Arcade’s target demographic will admit to actually being rapists when asked.
A lot of people accuse feminists of thinking that all men are rapists. That’s not true. But do you know who think all men are rapists?
Rapists do.
They really do. In psychological study, the profiling, the studies, it comes out again and again.
Virtually all rapists genuinely believe that all men rape, and other men just keep it hushed up better. And more, these people who really are rapists are constantly reaffirmed in their belief about the rest of mankind being rapists like them by things like rape jokes, that dismiss and normalize the idea of rape. 
If one in twenty guys is a real and true rapist, and you have any amount of social activity with other guys like yourself, really cool guy, then it is almost a statistical certainty that one time hanging out with friends and their friends, playing Halo with a bunch of guys online, in a WoW guild, or elsewhere, you were talking to a rapist. Not your fault. You can’t tell a rapist apart any better than anyone else can. It’s not like they announce themselves.
But, here’s the thing. It’s very likely that in some of these interactions with these guys, at some point or another someone told a rape joke. You, decent guy that you are, understood that they didn’t mean it, and it was just a joke. And so you laughed.
And, decent guy who would never condone rape, who would step in and stop rape if he saw it, who understands that rape is awful and wrong and bad, when you laughed?
That rapist who was in the group with you, that rapist thought that you were on his side. That rapist knew that you were a rapist like him. And he felt validated, and he felt he was among his comrades.
You. The rapist’s comrade.
And if that doesn’t make you feel sick to your stomach, if that doesn’t make you want to throw up, if that doesn’t disturb you or bother you or make you feel like maybe you should at least consider not participating in that kind of humor anymore…
Well, maybe you aren’t as opposed to rapists as you claim.


Goddammit, I really didn’t want to get in on this topic, but it helps one’s argument quite a lot more if one links to citations that aren’t copypasta comments on a blog. 
The 6% figure - “6% of college age men, slightly over 1 in 20, will admit to raping someone in anonymous surveys, as long as the word ‘rape’ isn’t used in the description of the act” - comes from "Repeat Rape and Multiple Offending Among Undetected Rapists" by David Lisak and Paul M. Miller, published in Violence and Victims, Vol 17, No. 1, 2002. The entire abstract is below:

Pooling data from four samples in which 1,882 men were assessed for acts of interpersonal violence, we report on 120 men whose self-reported acts met legal definitions of rape or attempted rape, but who were never prosecuted by criminal justice authorities. A majority of these undetected rapists were repeat rapists, and a majority also committed other acts of interpersonal violence. The repeat rapists averaged 5.8 rapes each. The 120 rapists were responsible for 1,225 separate acts of interpersonal violence, including rape, battery, and child physical and sexual abuse. These findings mirror those from studies of incarcerated sex offenders (Abel, Becker, Mittelman, Cunningham-Rathner, Rouleau, & Murphy, 1987; Weinrott and Saylor, 1991), indicating high rates of both repeat rape and multiple types of offending. Implications for the investigation and prosecution of this so-called “hidden” rape are discussed.

One issue, of many, that I have in how that comment frames the discussion is the disconnect between what the comment claims and what the study actually reports. The study did not focus on “college-age” males, generally conceived to be 18-22, give or take a couple years. It focused on males attending ”a mid-sized, urban commuter university where students are diverse both in age and ethnicity. The mean age of the sample was 26.5 years (SD = 8.28), with a range of 18 to 71. More than 20% were over age 30, and nearly 8% were over 40.” (p. 76) Unfortunately, the study doesn’t disclose the median age of the self-reported rapists were, nor the age range of these individuals.
The comments regarding the state of mind of rapists - “all rapists genuinely believe that all men rape, and other men just keep it hushed up better” - is not one I’m going to touch extensively at this moment, except to state that I cannot find any source to back up that statement. There might be a report, or reports, that conclude this, but I cannot find any.

mohandasgandhi:

uhuh-she-said:

mohandasgandhi:

jasencomstock:

theonion:

Daniel Tosh Chuckles Through Own Violent Rape:

‘You Just Gotta Laugh,’ Reports Comedian Through Blood And Tears

More.

Aaaaaaand the Onion just told a rape joke.

The point about not telling raping jokes because they enable and preserve rape culture is to never tell them at all, not counter rape jokes by telling more rape jokes. Why is this a difficult concept?

To be honest, I think it’s possible to tell a rape joke that is both insightful, thoughtful and tragic. Comedy and satire is not always about a guffaw and I do believe that one of it’s great advantages, is that it can get people to go to a very scary place with little resistance. To consider aspects of life they wouldn’t otherwise. Rape jokes can and often do veer into incredibly distasteful territory, but what I’m saying is: they don’t have to. 

Which is not to say that I think anybody needs to tolerate a rape joke. But I think calling something wrong across the board 100% of the time, does a disservice to what satire/comedy can actually accomplish.

That article is actually really disturbing and terrifying and as such shows just how awful Daniel Tosh really is. How disgusting what he was advocating was.  In this case, I honestly think this piece satire does not preserve rape culture, but actually is actively battling against it. 

I could not disagree more and there’s a very good reason why: rapists think all men rape and joking about it only cements this belief:

6% of college age men, slightly over 1 in 20, will admit to raping someone in anonymous surveys, as long as the word “rape” isn’t used in the description of the act.

6% of Penny Arcade’s target demographic will admit to actually being rapists when asked.

A lot of people accuse feminists of thinking that all men are rapists. That’s not true. But do you know who think all men are rapists?

Rapists do.

They really do. In psychological study, the profiling, the studies, it comes out again and again.

Virtually all rapists genuinely believe that all men rape, and other men just keep it hushed up better. And more, these people who really are rapists are constantly reaffirmed in their belief about the rest of mankind being rapists like them by things like rape jokes, that dismiss and normalize the idea of rape.

If one in twenty guys is a real and true rapist, and you have any amount of social activity with other guys like yourself, really cool guy, then it is almost a statistical certainty that one time hanging out with friends and their friends, playing Halo with a bunch of guys online, in a WoW guild, or elsewhere, you were talking to a rapist. Not your fault. You can’t tell a rapist apart any better than anyone else can. It’s not like they announce themselves.

But, here’s the thing. It’s very likely that in some of these interactions with these guys, at some point or another someone told a rape joke. You, decent guy that you are, understood that they didn’t mean it, and it was just a joke. And so you laughed.

And, decent guy who would never condone rape, who would step in and stop rape if he saw it, who understands that rape is awful and wrong and bad, when you laughed?

That rapist who was in the group with you, that rapist thought that you were on his side. That rapist knew that you were a rapist like him. And he felt validated, and he felt he was among his comrades.

You. The rapist’s comrade.

And if that doesn’t make you feel sick to your stomach, if that doesn’t make you want to throw up, if that doesn’t disturb you or bother you or make you feel like maybe you should at least consider not participating in that kind of humor anymore…

Well, maybe you aren’t as opposed to rapists as you claim.

Goddammit, I really didn’t want to get in on this topic, but it helps one’s argument quite a lot more if one links to citations that aren’t copypasta comments on a blog. 

The 6% figure - “6% of college age men, slightly over 1 in 20, will admit to raping someone in anonymous surveys, as long as the word ‘rape’ isn’t used in the description of the act” - comes from "Repeat Rape and Multiple Offending Among Undetected Rapists" by David Lisak and Paul M. Miller, published in Violence and Victims, Vol 17, No. 1, 2002. The entire abstract is below:

Pooling data from four samples in which 1,882 men were assessed for acts of interpersonal violence, we report on 120 men whose self-reported acts met legal definitions of rape or attempted rape, but who were never prosecuted by criminal justice authorities. A majority of these undetected rapists were repeat rapists, and a majority also committed other acts of interpersonal violence. The repeat rapists averaged 5.8 rapes each. The 120 rapists were responsible for 1,225 separate acts of interpersonal violence, including rape, battery, and child physical and sexual abuse. These findings mirror those from studies of incarcerated sex offenders (Abel, Becker, Mittelman, Cunningham-Rathner, Rouleau, & Murphy, 1987; Weinrott and Saylor, 1991), indicating high rates of both repeat rape and multiple types of offending. Implications for the investigation and prosecution of this so-called “hidden” rape are discussed.

One issue, of many, that I have in how that comment frames the discussion is the disconnect between what the comment claims and what the study actually reports. The study did not focus on “college-age” males, generally conceived to be 18-22, give or take a couple years. It focused on males attending ”a mid-sized, urban commuter university where students are diverse both in age and ethnicity. The mean age of the sample was 26.5 years (SD = 8.28), with a range of 18 to 71. More than 20% were over age 30, and nearly 8% were over 40.” (p. 76) Unfortunately, the study doesn’t disclose the median age of the self-reported rapists were, nor the age range of these individuals.

The comments regarding the state of mind of rapists - “all rapists genuinely believe that all men rape, and other men just keep it hushed up better” - is not one I’m going to touch extensively at this moment, except to state that I cannot find any source to back up that statement. There might be a report, or reports, that conclude this, but I cannot find any.

usagov:

Learn about these things and more:

  • The U.S. population increased by nearly 10% since the 2000 census.
  • In 2009, 16.7 percent of people in the United States were not covered by health insurance.
  • Of the 77.3 million people ages 3 and up enrolled in elementary, secondary, and post-secondary schools in 2009, 86.5% were enrolled in public schools in 2009.
motherjones:

Public Policy Polling, FTW.

motherjones:

Public Policy Polling, FTW.

motherjones:

This and other intriguing, outrage-makey facts about women in the military, in an infographic from Good.