theeconomist:

Remembrance: A chart of the first world war’s casualties on the centenary of the outbreak

theeconomist:

Remembrance: A chart of the first world war’s casualties on the centenary of the outbreak

motherjones:

Happy 10th anniversary, Iraq war. We got you these charts.

You give the most depressing gifts MoJo.

motherjones:

Happy 10th anniversary, Iraq war. We got you these charts.

You give the most depressing gifts MoJo.

Tags: Iraq war

pbsthisdayinhistory:

December 11, 1941: Germany and Italy Declare War on the United States
On this day in 1941, Nazi Germany’s Adolf Hitler and Fascist Italy’s Benito Mussolini declared war on the United States in support of their ally, the Empire of Japan. The U.S. government responded by quickly passing resolutions of war against the two Axis powers. 
Although the United States had previously claimed neutrality in Europe, these declarations led America into the European conflict of World War II. Three days prior, President Franklin Roosevelt had declared war against the Empire of Japan, the third Axis power, following the surprise attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor. 
Explore Ken Burns’s timeline of World War II to discover the most important and consequential events of this global conflict.
Photo: President Roosevelt signing the declaration of war against Germany, Dec. 11, 1941 (Library of Congress).

pbsthisdayinhistory:

December 11, 1941: Germany and Italy Declare War on the United States

On this day in 1941, Nazi Germany’s Adolf Hitler and Fascist Italy’s Benito Mussolini declared war on the United States in support of their ally, the Empire of Japan. The U.S. government responded by quickly passing resolutions of war against the two Axis powers. 

Although the United States had previously claimed neutrality in Europe, these declarations led America into the European conflict of World War II. Three days prior, President Franklin Roosevelt had declared war against the Empire of Japan, the third Axis power, following the surprise attack on the naval base at Pearl Harbor. 

Explore Ken Burns’s timeline of World War II to discover the most important and consequential events of this global conflict.

Photo: President Roosevelt signing the declaration of war against Germany, Dec. 11, 1941 (Library of Congress).

pbsthisdayinhistory:

December 7, 1941: Pearl Harbor Attacked
On this day in 1941, a surprise aerial strike was conducted by the Imperial Japanese navy against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Japan’s goal for the attack was to use it as a preventive measure to keep the U.S. Pacific Fleet from interfering with its planned military actions across the world.
The surprise attack not only struck a serious blow against the U.S. Pacific fleet, but also served as the critical factor for the United States joining World War II.
George Macartney Hunter was a naval officer assigned to the USS West Virginia stationed at Pearl Harbor. Read his journal notes from that day.
Photo: A small boat rescues a seaman from the 31,800 ton USS West Virginia burning in the foreground (Library of Congress).

pbsthisdayinhistory:

December 7, 1941: Pearl Harbor Attacked

On this day in 1941, a surprise aerial strike was conducted by the Imperial Japanese navy against the United States naval base at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. Japan’s goal for the attack was to use it as a preventive measure to keep the U.S. Pacific Fleet from interfering with its planned military actions across the world.

The surprise attack not only struck a serious blow against the U.S. Pacific fleet, but also served as the critical factor for the United States joining World War II.

George Macartney Hunter was a naval officer assigned to the USS West Virginia stationed at Pearl Harbor. Read his journal notes from that day.

Photo: A small boat rescues a seaman from the 31,800 ton USS West Virginia burning in the foreground (Library of Congress).

newshour:

Hamas official: “There is no more peace process”
Hamas representative Usamah Hamdan agreed to come on the NewsHour’s broadcast to be interviewed by correspondent Ray Suarez by phone. But Hamdan cancelled the interview shortly before it was expected to happen. 
We were intending to run the interview following Suarez’s interview with Israel’s Ambassador to the United States Michael Oren.
During an off-camera conversation with the NewsHour earlier in the day, Hamdan blamed the Israel’s military offensive in Gaza on Israeli politics:

“I think the Israelis are trying to gain some votes in the upcoming election,” he said, referring to the Israeli Parliamentary elections scheduled for Jan. 2013. “They are trying to improve their chances with the voters.”
Hamdan also defended rocket attacks launched from Gaza into Israeli population centers as the only possible response to the Israel’s technological advantage. “I think when you are facing an occupation, an armed occupation with air support and the best weapons made in the U.S.A., what do you do? You must do the best you can.” He allowed that from a military standpoint, the Gazans’ “weapons will not be equal to what the Israelis have, but we must resist until we are liberated.”
Hamdan also said the lack of a peace process as a reason to continue rocket attacks into Israel. “There is no more peace process,” he said. “Abu Mazen [Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas] is considered an obstacle by Israel and Netanyahu is not interested…So what are we to do? We must liberate our own.”
More

newshour:

Hamas official: “There is no more peace process”

Hamas representative Usamah Hamdan agreed to come on the NewsHour’s broadcast to be interviewed by correspondent Ray Suarez by phone. But Hamdan cancelled the interview shortly before it was expected to happen. 

We were intending to run the interview following Suarez’s interview with Israel’s Ambassador to the United States Michael Oren.

During an off-camera conversation with the NewsHour earlier in the day, Hamdan blamed the Israel’s military offensive in Gaza on Israeli politics:

“I think the Israelis are trying to gain some votes in the upcoming election,” he said, referring to the Israeli Parliamentary elections scheduled for Jan. 2013. “They are trying to improve their chances with the voters.”

Hamdan also defended rocket attacks launched from Gaza into Israeli population centers as the only possible response to the Israel’s technological advantage. “I think when you are facing an occupation, an armed occupation with air support and the best weapons made in the U.S.A., what do you do? You must do the best you can.” He allowed that from a military standpoint, the Gazans’ “weapons will not be equal to what the Israelis have, but we must resist until we are liberated.”

Hamdan also said the lack of a peace process as a reason to continue rocket attacks into Israel. “There is no more peace process,” he said. “Abu Mazen [Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas] is considered an obstacle by Israel and Netanyahu is not interested…So what are we to do? We must liberate our own.”

More

futurejournalismproject:

Tweeting the Gaza Strip and Tel Aviv: Andy Carvin at It Again
One of the most immediate and useful news spaces of this age will have to be Andy Carvin’s Twitter feed, originally put to such good use during the Egyptian Revolution and greater Arab Spring last year.
He’s at it again from Istanbul, following the developments between Israel and Palestine on Twitter, retweeting the people nearby and anywhere else, so long as they have something meaningful to say.

futurejournalismproject:

Tweeting the Gaza Strip and Tel Aviv: Andy Carvin at It Again

One of the most immediate and useful news spaces of this age will have to be Andy Carvin’s Twitter feed, originally put to such good use during the Egyptian Revolution and greater Arab Spring last year.

He’s at it again from Istanbul, following the developments between Israel and Palestine on Twitter, retweeting the people nearby and anywhere else, so long as they have something meaningful to say.


‘In Flanders fields the poppies blow / Between the crosses, row on row … ‘Photograph: Graham Turner / Guardian

‘In Flanders fields the poppies blow / Between the crosses, row on row … ‘
Photograph: Graham Turner / Guardian

"Of course, I suppose the Randians out there would say that a lack of parental leave or child support actually benefits moms in the long run by creating a disincentive for women to have children out of wedlock or that they “can’t afford” (and just typing that makes me cringe). But, really, how’s that working out for ya?"

Political Animal - The Real War on Moms Has a Mortality Rate (via bensgrabbag)

(via bensgrabbag)

Vice:

TAKE A STROLL… WITH ROB DELANEY - COOKING UP A WAR? DON’T FORGET THE PISS
People are understandably upset after video emerged of what appears to be U.S. Marines urinating on Afghan corpses. If they’re surprised, however, they need to pick up a history book. Soldiers piss on corpses in every war. On both sides. Soldiers rape civilians, as a rule, in every war that has ever taken place since time immemorial. Rape is a weapon of war. Piss, some people are now learning, is a weapon of war. Some fucked-up, disgusting combination of the two, plus shit and dismemberment, is a weapon of war. Bad guys do it. “Good” guys do it. When a country’s government decides to wage war, they are deciding to sanction piss, rape, and the torture and murder of women and children who had the colossally bad fortune to be in the midst of the war. When the U.S. decided to enter into Afghanistan and then Iraq, they (i.e. Congress and the president, and the myriad companies that profit from war) knew this. I’m not singling out the U.S. here; while we’re as good at implementing the more horrific, soul-erasing weapons as anyone, we’re not alone. Does your country have a military? In times of war, they kill people, and sometimes they piss on them.
If it isn’t clear why I’m detailing this, it is because I want to express an old thought: war is the very worst thing there is. And if you command an army, you better the fuck understand, in your probably cowardly, definitely privileged, likely draft-dodging bones, that when you send soldiers out to fight and die, they are going to do some unconscionable, irreversible things. And they are doing it in your name. Because you told them to.  And pissing on a corpse is a FUCKING POEM compared to issuing an order for beautiful young people to go and kill other beautiful young people in a land far away, because you, in essence, “felt like it.”

Vice:

TAKE A STROLL… WITH ROB DELANEY - COOKING UP A WAR? DON’T FORGET THE PISS

People are understandably upset after video emerged of what appears to be U.S. Marines urinating on Afghan corpses. If they’re surprised, however, they need to pick up a history book. Soldiers piss on corpses in every war. On both sides. Soldiers rape civilians, as a rule, in every war that has ever taken place since time immemorial. Rape is a weapon of war. Piss, some people are now learning, is a weapon of war. Some fucked-up, disgusting combination of the two, plus shit and dismemberment, is a weapon of war. Bad guys do it. “Good” guys do it. When a country’s government decides to wage war, they are deciding to sanction piss, rape, and the torture and murder of women and children who had the colossally bad fortune to be in the midst of the war. When the U.S. decided to enter into Afghanistan and then Iraq, they (i.e. Congress and the president, and the myriad companies that profit from war) knew this. I’m not singling out the U.S. here; while we’re as good at implementing the more horrific, soul-erasing weapons as anyone, we’re not alone. Does your country have a military? In times of war, they kill people, and sometimes they piss on them.

If it isn’t clear why I’m detailing this, it is because I want to express an old thought: war is the very worst thing there is. And if you command an army, you better the fuck understand, in your probably cowardly, definitely privileged, likely draft-dodging bones, that when you send soldiers out to fight and die, they are going to do some unconscionable, irreversible things. And they are doing it in your name. Because you told them to.  And pissing on a corpse is a FUCKING POEM compared to issuing an order for beautiful young people to go and kill other beautiful young people in a land far away, because you, in essence, “felt like it.”


'In Flanders fields the poppies blow / Between the crosses, row on row … 'Photograph: Graham Turner / Guardian

'In Flanders fields the poppies blow / Between the crosses, row on row … '
Photograph: Graham Turner / Guardian

motherjones:

We’re Spending More on Nukes Than We Did During the Cold War
Memo to the budget supercommittee: If you’re looking for billions in savings, check out the bloated nuclear weapons complex.

Proposed solution to the number of nuclear weapons in the world: Amend the 1963 Partial Test Ban Treaty, which banned nuclear explosions in space, and start using our nukes, cooperatively with other states and under strict regulation, for interstellar travel.
Also, happy birthday Carl Sagan.

motherjones:

We’re Spending More on Nukes Than We Did During the Cold War

Memo to the budget supercommittee: If you’re looking for billions in savings, check out the bloated nuclear weapons complex.

Proposed solution to the number of nuclear weapons in the world: Amend the 1963 Partial Test Ban Treaty, which banned nuclear explosions in space, and start using our nukes, cooperatively with other states and under strict regulation, for interstellar travel.

Also, happy birthday Carl Sagan.

(Source: Mother Jones)

(Source: motherjones)

everqueer:

Some jerk sent us two boxes of this awful book (SPOILER ALERT: George Washington - Patriot; George Soros - Pinhead) instead of anything soldiers at a remote outpost in Afghanistan might need, like, say, food or soap. Just burned the whole lot of them on my Commander’s orders. 

(Source: )

washingtonpoststyle:

Ten years ago today, the war in Afghanistan began as the good war.
Today it is the good-enough war.
Photo by Nikki Kahn (The Washington Post)

washingtonpoststyle:

Ten years ago today, the war in Afghanistan began as the good war.

Today it is the good-enough war.

Photo by Nikki Kahn (The Washington Post)